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  3. Animal Physiology and Growth

Animal Physiology and Growth (DASC20010)

Undergraduate level 2Points: 12.5On Campus (Parkville)

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Overview

Year of offer2017
Subject levelUndergraduate Level 2
Subject codeDASC20010
Campus
Parkville
Availability
Semester 1
FeesSubject EFTSL, Level, Discipline & Census Date

Physiology is the integrative study of the control of normal body function. This subject will examine the functions of different cell types and their interactions in organs and tissues; mechanisms by which organs are controlled and their functions are regulated; thermoregulatory processes and fluid balance; the physiology of the nervous system, of digestion, circulation, respiration, and excretion; the processes of growth and development, and factors that can be manipulated to alter animal performance under normal conditions.

Intended learning outcomes

On completion of this subject students should be aware:

  • The working knowledge of structure and normal physiological function of domestic animals
  • The terminology and basic principles of structure and function in animals
  • Functions of different cell types and their interactions in organs and tissues
  • Mechanisms by which organ systems are controlled and functions coordinated
  • The physiology of the nervous system, of digestion, circulation, respiration, and excretion
  • The processes of growth
  • Differences in animal performance relating to physiological factors

Generic skills

On completion of the subject the students should have developed the following generic skills:

  • Academic excellence
  • Greater in-depth understanding of scientific disciplines and of the practical and ethical aspects of working in animal physiology
  • The student's flexibility and level of transferable skills should be enhanced through improved time management
  • An enhanced ability to communicate ideas effectively in both written and verbal formats

Last updated: 23 October 2017