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Public Economics (ECON90027)

Graduate courseworkPoints: 12.5On Campus (Parkville)

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Overview

Year of offer2017
Subject levelGraduate coursework
Subject codeECON90027
Campus
Parkville
Availability
Semester 2
FeesSubject EFTSL, Level, Discipline & Census Date

The general problems associated with the role of the state in the economy. Topics will be chosen from the theory of the state; the role of government in promoting economic growth; collective choice mechanisms; the economic analysis of bureaucracy; public goods; social insurance; national debt; and taxation issues.

Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this subject students should be able to:

  • Describe differences between positive and normative theories in public economics;
  • Explain the economic rationale for the existence of the state;
  • Explain the growth of the government sector over the twentieth century;
  • Derive the criteria identifying the optimal size of the government;
  • Analyse different economic theories of the bureaucracy;
  • Explain the paradox of voting;
  • Analyse the positive and normative properties of collective decision-making mechanisms;
  • Explain the implications of Arrow's Impossibility Theorem for public economics;
  • Critically evaluate different models of the political business cycle;
  • Analyse the implications of countries' stocks of public debt; and
  • Explain the principles of optimal taxation.

Generic skills

On successful completion of this subject, students should have improved the following generic skills:

  • High level of development: problem solving; application of theory to practice; interpretation and analysis; critical thinking; evaluation of data and other information; statistical reasoning.
  • Moderate level of development: oral communication; written communication; synthesis of data and other information; use of computer software; accessing data and other information from a range of sources; receptiveness to alternative ideas.
  • Some level of development: collaborative learning.

Last updated: 16 August 2017