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Physics for Biomedicine (PHYC10007)

Undergraduate level 1Points: 12.5On Campus (Parkville)

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Overview

Year of offer2017
Subject levelUndergraduate Level 1
Subject codePHYC10007
Campus
Parkville
Availability
Semester 2
FeesSubject EFTSL, Level, Discipline & Census Date

This subject will develop students' appreciation of the importance of physical principles to biomedicine as well as their understanding of the principles underpinning human structure and function, medical diagnostics and therapeutics.
The subject provides an introduction to:
Mechanics: in the context of human and animal movement (introduction to Newton's laws of motion, energy transfer and transformation).

Waves: the basis of modern physics including lasers;
Fluids: blood flow, respiration (pressure in fluids, fluid flow, viscosity);
Thermal physics: energy balance of living organisms (thermal energy, temperature, heating processes, first law of thermodynamics);
Electricity and magnetism: bioelectricity, nerve conduction, electrical safety (forces between electric charges, electric circuits, resistance, capacitance, magnetic forces);
Atomic physics and lasers: fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy (structure of the atom, photons, spectroscopy, interaction of light with matter);
Radiation: radiation safety, therapeutic uses of radiation (the atomic nucleus, isotopes, nuclear decay and radiation, physical and biological half-life, ionising radiation); and
Imaging: modern biomedical imaging (X-rays, CT-scans and angiography, ultrasound imaging, positron emission tomography).

Intended learning outcomes

To enable students to understand the importance of physical principles to biological and environmental sciences, and develop their capacity to:

  • understand and explain the physics principles of fluids, thermal physics, electricity and magnetism, atomic, radiation and imaging physics;
  • apply these principles using logical reasoning, together with appropriate mathematical reasoning, to a variety of familiar and novel situations and problems in the biological and environmental sciences; and
  • acquire experimental data using a range of measurement instruments and interpret these data.

Generic skills

A student who completes this subject should be able to:

  • explain their understanding of physics principles and applications lucidly, both in writing and orally;
  • acquire and interpret experimental data and design experimental investigations;
  • participate as an effective member of a group in tutorial discussions, laboratory and study groups;
  • think independently and analytically, and direct his or her own learning;
  • manage time effectively in order to be prepared for regular practical and tutorial classes, tests and the examination.

Eligibility and requirements

Prerequisites

Code Name Teaching period Credit Points
MAST10012 Introduction to Mathematics
Summer Term
Semester 1
12.5
or VCE Unit 3/4 Mathematical Methods (either)

OR

Admission into the Bachelor of Biomedicine course

Assumed knowledge: some knowledge of physics to Year 10 level.

Corequisites

None

Non-allowed subjects

Students may only gain credit for one of

  • PHYC10002 Physics 2: Advanced
  • PHYC10004 Physics 2: Physical Science & Technology
  • PHYC10006 Physics 2: Life Sciences & Environment
  • PHYC10007 Physics for Biomedicine

Students who have completed VCE Unit 3/4 Physics (with a score of 25 or more) will not be permitted to enrol in this subject.

Core participation requirements

The University of Melbourne is committed to providing students with reasonable adjustments to assessment and participation under the Disability Standards for Education (2005), and the Assessment and Results Policy (MPF1326). Students are expected to meet the core participation requirements for their course. These can be viewed under Entry and Participation Requirements for the course outlines in the Handbook.

Further details on how to seek academic adjustments can be found on the Student Equity and Disability Support website: http://services.unimelb.edu.au/student-equity/home

Assessment

Additional details

Ongoing assessment of practical work during the semester (25%); ten weekly assignments (10 x 1.5% = 15%); a 3-hour written examination in the examination period (60%).

Satisfactory completion of practical work is necessary to pass the subject (i.e. attendance and submission of work for at least 80% of workshop sessions together with a result for assessed work of at least 50%).

Dates & times

  • Semester 2
    Principal coordinatorRoger Rassool
    Mode of deliveryOn Campus — Parkville
    Contact hours3 x one hour lectures per week; 1 x one hour tutorial per week; 28 hours of practical work (8 x three hour laboratory sessions and up to 30 minutes of pre-laboratory activity) and 10 weekly assignments of 30 minutes each during the semester.
    Total time commitment170 hours
    Teaching period24 July 2017 to 22 October 2017
    Last self-enrol date 4 August 2017
    Census date31 August 2017
    Last date to withdraw without fail22 September 2017
    Assessment period ends17 November 2017

    Semester 2 contact information

    Director of First Year Studies

    Email: dfys@physics.unimelb.edu.au

Time commitment details

Estimated total time commitment of 170 hours

Additional delivery details

This subject requires all students to actively and safely participate in laboratory activities.

Further information

  • Texts

    Prescribed texts

    Physics for the Life Sciences 3E, Martin Zinke-Allmag, Ken Sills, Rezza Nejat and Eduuardo Galiano-Riveros, Cengage Learning: ISBN 9780176558697

  • Subject notes

    This unit is only available to students enrolled in the Bachelor of Biomedicine.

    Required equipment: laboratory coat and safety glasses.

    To prevent repetition of content, students who have completed VCE Unit 3/4 Physics, or equivalent, normally will not be permitted to enrol in this subject.

  • Available through the Community Access Program

    About the Community Access Program (CAP)

    This subject is available through the Community Access Program (also called Single Subject Studies) which allows you to enrol in single subjects offered by the University of Melbourne, without the commitment required to complete a whole degree.

    Entry requirements including prerequisites may apply. Please refer to the CAP applications page for further information.

Last updated: 23 January 2019