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  3. Ethnic Nationalism and the Modern World

Ethnic Nationalism and the Modern World (ANTH20011)

Undergraduate level 2Points: 12.5On Campus (Parkville)

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Overview

Year of offer2018
Subject levelUndergraduate Level 2
Subject codeANTH20011
Campus
Parkville
Availability
Semester 1
FeesSubject EFTSL, Level, Discipline & Census Date

Ethnicity and nationalism are of special concern to anthropologists, especially in instances where anthropology becomes part of nationalist discourse. This subject considers ethnicity and nationalism through the in-depth analysis of a case study from the developing world, but draws on comparative material from Africa, the Americas, Asia, Australia, Europe and the Pacific. Students will examine different theoretical approaches to ethnicity, nationalism and ethnic nationalism, in particular the relationships between the formation of nation states and processes of 'development', 'transition' and 'underdevelopment'; the roles of actors, from political actors to ordinary people, in the construction of national projects; the relationships between historic and contemporary processes in the construction of national projects; how national projects are constructed, enforced and culturally maintained and the relationships between globalisation, migration, transnationalism and ethnic nationalism in the modern world.

Intended learning outcomes

On completion of this subject students should:

  • Show an understanding of core theoretical approaches to the understanding of ethnicity, nationalism and ethnic nationalism;
  • Show an ability to apply and critically assess theories of ethnicity, nationalism and ethnic nationalism in relation to empirical case studies;
  • Show an understanding of the relationships between the formation of nation states and processes of development, transition and underdevelopment;
  • Show an understanding of the respective roles of different actors, from political actors to ordinary people, in the construction of national projects;
  • Be able to work collaboratively with peers;
  • Show an understanding of the relationships between globalization, migration, trans-nationalism and ethnic nationalism in the modern world;
  • Show an understanding of the relationships between historic and contemporary processes in the construction of national projects;
  • Show an ability to identify and critically assess the implicitly ethnic nationalist content in anthropological and other social scientific writing;
  • Be able to communicate effectively in a variety of written and oral formats.

Last updated: 10 February 2018