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Magnetism in Chemistry (CHEM90046)

Graduate courseworkPoints: 6.25Not available in 2019

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Overview

Year of offerNot available in 2019
Subject levelGraduate coursework
Subject codeCHEM90046
FeesSubject EFTSL, Level, Discipline & Census Date

This subject will explore magnetochemistry in the context of isolated spins, discrete spin clusters and extended systems. Areas covered will include magnetic susceptibility, the mechanisms of magnetic exchange interactions, long range ordering in extended solids, spin crossover complexes and single-molecule magnets.

Intended learning outcomes

  • Demonstrate an increased knowledge and understanding of magnetochemistry in the context of isolated spins, discrete spin clusters and extended systems
  • Explain the magnetic properties of isolated organic radicals and 3d and 4f metal ions, the mechanisms of magnetic exchange interactions, long range ordering in extended solids and single-molecule magnetism
  • Use investigative skills, critical thought and the ability to evaluate information and to analyse literature reports of magnetochemical studies and data
  • Understand the microscopic quantum mechanical origin of magnetic phenomena in molecules and molecular materials based on transition metal and lanthanide ions, with special focus on exchange coupling, magnetic anisotropy, and spin relaxation dynamics, and use this knowledge to calculate observable magnetic properties of these systems.

Generic skills

  • advanced problem-solving and critical thinking skills
  • an ability to evaluate the professional literature
  • an understanding of the changing knowledge base
  • a capacity to apply concepts developed in one area to a different context
  • the ability to use conceptual models to rationalize experimental observations

Eligibility and requirements

Prerequisites

None

Corequisites

None

Non-allowed subjects

None

Core participation requirements

The University of Melbourne is committed to providing students with reasonable adjustments to assessment and participation under the Disability Standards for Education (2005), and the Assessment and Results Policy (MPF1326). Students are expected to meet the core participation requirements for their course. These can be viewed under Entry and Participation Requirements for the course outlines in the Handbook.

Further details on how to seek academic adjustments can be found on the Student Equity and Disability Support website: http://services.unimelb.edu.au/student-equity/home

Assessment

Description

  • At the 9-lecture mark each module will be assessed by a 15 minutre oral presentation of a literature article. (25%)
  • 1.5 hour of examination after completion of the module (this is seen as equivalent to 1500 words) (75%)

Dates & times

Not available in 2019

Further information

  • Texts

    Prescribed texts

    There are no specifically prescribed or recommended texts for this subject.

Last updated: 22 January 2019