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  3. Chinese Economic Documents

Chinese Economic Documents (CHIN20009)

Undergraduate level 2Points: 12.5On Campus (Parkville)

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Overview

Year of offer2019
Subject levelUndergraduate Level 2
Subject codeCHIN20009
Campus
Parkville
Availability
Semester 1
FeesSubject EFTSL, Level, Discipline & Census Date

This subject is a reading course on Chinese economic and business documents. Students will be given a guided introduction to a variety of economic documents, including official policy statements, statistical material, newspaper reports and comments, and information drawn from the world wide web. Special attention will be paid to foreign trade issues and the economic links between Australia and China. The terminology and style of these documents will be analyzed, as will the source and purpose of their publication.

Intended learning outcomes

On completion of this subject, students will:

  • improve their skills in the comprehension of written Chinese.
  • increase their passive as well as active vocabulary.
  • improve their ability to analyze Chinese documents.
  • gain knowledge of some issues of contemporary Chinese economic policy.
  • acquire skills to extract information from complex specialized materials written in Chinese, and render those accurately into English.
  • be able to present specialized technical information in a correct professional format.
  • develop a knowledge of the contemporary global socio-economic environment.

Generic skills

  • Be able to research, through competent use of the library and other information sources.
  • Be able to define areas of inquiry and methods of research.
  • Be able to understand social and economic context.
  • Show some attention to detail through essay preparation and writing.
  • Acquire general written communication skills by careful preparation of all written work.
  • Acquire time management and planning skills through organizing workloads for various learning tasks.

Last updated: 11 October 2019