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  3. Managing Justice: Agencies and the State

Managing Justice: Agencies and the State (CRIM30010)

Undergraduate level 3Points: 12.5On Campus (Parkville)

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Overview

Year of offer2019
Subject levelUndergraduate Level 3
Subject codeCRIM30010
Campus
Parkville
Availability
Semester 1
FeesSubject EFTSL, Level, Discipline & Census Date

This subject examines the intersections between social justice and criminal justice in the state's management of individuals and groups it considers to be at risk of harming, or being harmed, by others. Its core interests are to explore the relationship between different agencies and the state in the management of criminal justice in Victoria; the broader socio-political and historical context in which they operate; and the theory-practice nexus. To complement scholarly perspectives on complex social concerns, (including, for example, in relation to youth justice; family violence and sexual assault; mental illness; drug and alcohol use; imprisonment detention), guest lecturers from local agencies and institutions will discuss contemporary practices of criminal justice management in Victoria and their implications for social justice more broadly. Students are encouraged to theorise, historicise, analyse and reflect upon these matters including with reference to a particular case study. The subject encourages critical reflection on the discipline and practice of criminology and holds additional appeal for those intending to work in criminal justice/social justice fields immediately after graduation, as well as those keen to pursue further studies (including internship options) at Honours, Graduate Diploma in Arts (Advanced) or Masters level.

Intended learning outcomes

On completion of this subject students should:

  • Understand the socio-economic, political, discursive and historical conditions influencing different conceptions of the relationship between social justice and criminal justice;
  • Understand the implications of different conceptions of the relationship between social justice and criminal justice for particular groups and individuals;
  • Appreciate the challenges associated with seeking to apply complex criminological theory arising in international contexts to localised criminal justice policy and practice in Victoria;
  • Appreciate the complexity of the relationship between government and non-government agencies and the state in the management of social justice and criminal justice in Victoria;
  • Be able to critically evaluate examples of different theoretical and applied conceptions of the social justice:criminal justice nexus in Victoria;
  • Communicate effectively in oral and written formats.

Last updated: 28 May 2019