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  3. Body Balance

Body Balance (DNCE10020)

Undergraduate level 1Points: 6.25On Campus (Southbank)

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Overview

Year of offer2019
Subject levelUndergraduate Level 1
Subject codeDNCE10020
Campus
Southbank
Availability
Semester 2
FeesSubject EFTSL, Level, Discipline & Census Date

BODY BALANCE utilizes techniques and approaches from various somatic practices e.g., Yoga, Feldenkrais, Conditioning programs etc., to assist the Dance student to improve individual body range of movement, flexibility, strength and tone. Easeful movement is facilitated through emphasis on correcting muscular imbalances throughout the body.

Intended learning outcomes

This subject will enable students to:

  • identify muscle imbalances and improve muscle function to promote more easeful movement;
  • improve and retrain neuro-muscular patterning and coordination and work towards freedom from habituated restrictions and greater connectedness;
  • maximise mechanical balance of the skeletal structure and improve whole body integration;
  • improve lumbo-pelvic stability and mobility;
  • develop the ability to make informed choices about appropriate exercises in training and rehabilitation.

Generic skills

On completing this subject students will have:

  • the ability to interpret, analyse and evaluate information
  • the capacity to think critically
  • the ability to exercise imaginative and transformative processes
  • the capacity to solve problems
  • the ability to apply theory to practice
  • the capacity for kinaesthetic awareness;
  • the capacity to work with unconditional positive regard for self and others
  • the capacity to utilise an internal evaluative mechanism
  • the capacity to give and receive informed feedback;
  • the capacity to develop a work methodology;
  • the capacity to participate effectively in collaborative learning as a team member whilst respecting individual difference
  • the capacity to engage in productive self directed learning and research.

Last updated: 23 July 2019