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Engineering Practice and Communication (ENGR90021)

Graduate courseworkPoints: 12.5On Campus (Parkville)

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Overview

Year of offer2019
Subject levelGraduate coursework
Subject codeENGR90021
Campus
Parkville
Availability
Semester 1
Semester 2
FeesSubject EFTSL, Level, Discipline & Census Date

This subject introduces students to the nature of engineering work and the engineering profession. The one activity that professional engineers spend the majority of their work time undertaking is communication, whether in the verbal or written form. One of the aims of this subject is to develop the critical skills of effective oral and written communications allowing them to learn how to effectively engage with stakeholders and clients. Students will also learn about how engineers identify problems then formulate solutions. Engineers need to be able to assimilate information from a range of sources. In this subject, students will learn effective use of library and information resources, how to share information and to manage knowledge. As engineers rarely work in isolation, students will develop their teamwork skills and will learn about meeting and group dynamics. Other professional topics covered include ethics and academic honesty, and the engineering recruitment process.

Intended learning outcomes

INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES (ILO)

On completion of this subject the student is expected to:

  1. Describe the role of engineers in an engineering organisation
  2. Work effectively in a small team, including evaluating peer and team performance
  3. Identify and define a challenge in engineering
  4. Research solutions to an engineering problem
  5. Evaluate solutions against agreed criteria
  6. Present information orally and in writing.

Generic skills

  • Ability to communicate effectively, with the engineering team and with the community at large
  • Ability to function effectively as an individual and in multidisciplinary and multicultural teams, as a team leader or manager as well as an effective team member
  • Ability to undertake problem identification, formulation and solution
  • Ability to utilise a systems approach to complex problems and to design and operational performance
  • Understanding of social, cultural, global and environmental responsibilities and the need to employ principles of sustainable development
  • Ability to manage information and documentation
  • Capacity for lifelong learning and professional development.

Eligibility and requirements

Prerequisites

  • Entry into the MC-ENG Master of Engineering OR the 761EM Master of Engineering Management OR 532PM Master of Project Management

OR

  • 200 points of undergraduate study

Corequisites

None

Non-allowed subjects

Credit points will not be given for the following subjects when taking this subject

Code Name Teaching period Credit Points
ENGR10004 Engineering Systems Design 1
Semester 1
Semester 2
12.5
ENGR10003 Engineering Systems Design 2
Summer Term
Semester 2
12.5

Core participation requirements

The University of Melbourne is committed to providing students with reasonable adjustments to assessment and participation under the Disability Standards for Education (2005), and the Assessment and Results Policy (MPF1326). Students are expected to meet the core participation requirements for their course. These can be viewed under Entry and Participation Requirements for the course outlines in the Handbook.

Further details on how to seek academic adjustments can be found on the Student Equity and Disability Support website: http://services.unimelb.edu.au/student-equity/home

Assessment

Description

Individual Assessments

  • Assignment one: Project proposal (10%). Requires approximately 5-7 hours of work. Addresses Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs) 1 and 4. Due week 4.
  • Research briefing paper (20%). Requires approximately 20-30 hours of work. Addresses ILOs 4, 5 and 6. Due week 8.
  • Up to 4 entries in a journal (20%). Requires approximately 25-30 hours of work. Addresses ILOs 1, 3, 4 and 5. Due weeks 2-12.
  • Assignment two: Peer review (5%). Requires approximately 2-3 hours of work. Addresses ILOs 2 and 6. Due week 12.
  • One written report of approximately 1000 words (10%). Requires approximately 13-15 hours of work. Addresses ILOs 1-4. Due week 12 (10%)

Hurdle Requirement: The combined mark for all individually assessed assignments must be 50% or greater in order to pass the subject as a whole.

Group Assessments

  • One team-based oral presentation and written summary with four team members (10%). Requires approximately 13-15 hours of work. Addresses ILOs 2-6. Due week 5.
  • One oral presentation with four team members (5%). Requires approximately 2-3 hours of work. Addresses ILO 6. Due week 12.
  • One assignment with four team members of approximately 2000 words (20%). Requires approximately 25-30 hours of work per student. Addresses ILOs 1-6. Due in the first week of the examination period.

Dates & times

  • Semester 1
    Principal coordinatorDavid Shallcross
    Mode of deliveryOn Campus — Parkville
    Contact hours1 x 1 hour lecture per week + 1 x 2 hour workshop per week
    Total time commitment200 hours
    Teaching period 4 March 2019 to 2 June 2019
    Last self-enrol date15 March 2019
    Census date31 March 2019
    Last date to withdraw without fail10 May 2019
    Assessment period ends28 June 2019

    Semester 1 contact information

    Prof David Shallcross

    dcshal@unimelb.edu.au

  • Semester 2
    Principal coordinatorDavid Shallcross
    Mode of deliveryOn Campus — Parkville
    Contact hours1 x 1 hour lecture per week + 1 x 2 hour workshop per week
    Total time commitment200 hours
    Teaching period29 July 2019 to 27 October 2019
    Last self-enrol date 9 August 2019
    Census date31 August 2019
    Last date to withdraw without fail27 September 2019
    Assessment period ends22 November 2019

    Semester 2 contact information

    Prof David Shallcross

    dcshal@unimelb.edu.au

Time commitment details

200 hours

Further information

  • Texts

    Prescribed texts

    Recommended texts and other resources

    Dowling D., Carew, A & Hadgraft, R., 2012, Engineering Your Future, Wiley, 2nd edn

  • Subject notes

    LEARNING AND TEACHING METHODS

    The subject will be delivered through a combination of lectures and interactive workshops.

    INDICATIVE KEY LEARNING RESOURCES

    Students will have access to lecture notes and lecture slides.

    CAREERS / INDUSTRY LINKS

    Speakers from industry are regular contributors to this subject.

  • Available through the Community Access Program

    About the Community Access Program (CAP)

    This subject is available through the Community Access Program (also called Single Subject Studies) which allows you to enrol in single subjects offered by the University of Melbourne, without the commitment required to complete a whole degree.

    Entry requirements including prerequisites may apply. Please refer to the CAP applications page for further information.

    Additional information for this subject

    Subject coordinator approval required

  • Available to Study Abroad and/or Study Exchange Students

    This subject is available to students studying at the University from eligible overseas institutions on exchange and study abroad. Students are required to satisfy any listed requirements, such as pre- and co-requisites, for enrolment in the subject.

Last updated: 11 April 2019