1. Handbook
  2. Subjects
  3. Critical Issues in Contemporary Art A

Critical Issues in Contemporary Art A (FINA60013)

Graduate coursework level 6Points: 12.5On Campus (Southbank)

You’re viewing the 2019 Handbook:
Or view archived Handbooks

Overview

Year of offer2019
Subject levelGraduate coursework Level 6
Subject codeFINA60013
Campus
Southbank
Availability
Semester 1
FeesSubject EFTSL, Level, Discipline & Census Date

This subject provides students with an introduction to critical argumentation in the visual arts by addressing significant issues and topics in the field of contemporary art. In particular, the course examines the relation between the critical concepts of vanguard modernism and postmodernist “trans-avantgarde” and “retro” cultural phenomena. The course also investigates the relation between postmodernism and the mass media as well as the emergence of new media and new technologies.

Intended learning outcomes

Throughout this semester students should learn to recognize and be able to critically interpret works of art characteristic of the period of the last half of the twentieth century in the dominance of post-modernism. They will discuss and critically debate key topics and text in class and present their study and conclusions through written assignments.

Generic skills

At the completion of the subject students should be able to:

• demonstrate capacities for artistic imagination, creativity, transformation and interpretation;

• demonstrate practical skills in respect of critical analysis, problem solving, report writing, and oral and written communication;

• demonstrate a flexible and innovative approach to the national and international challenges for the professional visual artist in the 21st century;

• work at various levels, both as an individual and as a team member, in a wide variety of visual artistic environments;

• demonstrate an open, independent and inquiring attitude towards contemporary cultural developments and new ideas;

• understand their relationship with and responsibility to their cultural environment and society.

Last updated: 11 November 2018