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Patterns and Processes of Landscape Fire (FRST90025)

Graduate courseworkPoints: 12.5On Campus (Parkville)

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Overview

Year of offer2019
Subject levelGraduate coursework
Subject codeFRST90025
Campus
Parkville
Availability
February
FeesSubject EFTSL, Level, Discipline & Census Date

The course covers the fundamentals of fire behaviour and the key drivers. Students will examine the importance of the key factors affecting fire behaviour including fuels, weather, topography and ignitions. Methodologies for measuring fuels, fuel moisture, and weather will be examined through theoretical and practical approaches. Using these skills, students will learn computer and manual approaches for predicting the extent and intensity of landscape fires in a range of ecosystems. Students will apply the knowledge of fire patterns to examine how prescribed burning might be used for land management and the fundamentals of wildfire suppression strategies and tactics. Finally, we will assess the potential changes to fire patterns under global climate change.

Intended learning outcomes

By the end of the subject students should have:

 

  • An understanding the importance of fuel composition and structure on fire behaviour. In particular, an understanding of the importance of fuel moisture, composition, accumulation, decomposition and spatial distribution.
  • An understand the fundamentals of fire behaviour ‐ pyrolysis, combustion, and heat transfer
  • Experience in the use of fire behaviour prediction using manual methods and models linked to Geographic Information Systems.
  • Experience in the use of fire behaviour prediction using manual methods and models linked to Geographic Information Systems.
  • Knowledge of the effects of climate and weather patterns on fire occurrence and behaviour.
  • Experience using weather observations and forecasts to predict fire behaviour.
  • Critical analysis of the potential changes to fire regimes under future climate scenarios.

Generic skills

Highly developed written communication skills to allow informed dialogue with individuals and groups from industry, government and the community

Eligibility and requirements

Prerequisites

None

Corequisites

None

Non-allowed subjects

None

Core participation requirements

The University of Melbourne is committed to providing students with reasonable adjustments to assessment and participation under the Disability Standards for Education (2005), and the Assessment and Results Policy (MPF1326). Students are expected to meet the core participation requirements for their course. These can be viewed under Entry and Participation Requirements for the course outlines in the Handbook.

Further details on how to seek academic adjustments can be found on the Student Equity and Disability Support website: http://services.unimelb.edu.au/student-equity/home

Assessment

DescriptionTimingPercentage
  • February only
  • Five small online "quizzes" (thought-out the intensive period, equivalent to 750 words) – 15%,
  • 750 words
From week 1 to week 215%
  • February only
  • A short group presentation of a scientific paper (equivalent to 250 words) – 5% during the intensive period.
  • 250 words
From week 1 to week 25%
  • February only
  • Fire prediction assignment (2000 words) - 40% due 3 weeks after the intensive subject.
  • 2,000 words
During the assessment period40%
  • February only
  • Fire research assignment (2000 words) – 40% due 7 weeks after the intensive subject.
  • 2,000 words
During the assessment period40%

Dates & times

  • February
    Principal coordinatorTrent Penman
    Mode of deliveryOn Campus — Parkville
    Contact hours70 hours – Week 1 ‐ 35 hour field trip (lectures, workshop, laboratory, forest practicals), Week 2 ‐ 26 hours (lectures, workshops or equivalent), 9 hours (tutorials/computer laboratory).
    Total time commitment170 hours
    Pre teaching start date25 January 2019
    Pre teaching requirements2 weeks prior to the subject commencing.
    Teaching period11 February 2019 to 22 February 2019
    Last self-enrol date28 January 2019
    Census date15 February 2019
    Last date to withdraw without fail15 March 2019
    Assessment period ends12 April 2019

Time commitment details

170 hours.

Further information

  • Texts

    Prescribed texts

    Recommended texts and other resources

    Bradstock RA, Gill AM, Williams RJ (2012) 'Flammable Australia: Fire Regimes, Biodiversity and Ecosystems in a Changing World.' (CSIRO publishing: Collingwood, VIC, Australia)

    Cheney NP, Sullivan AL (1997) 'Grassfires: Fuel, Weather and Fire Behaviour.' (CSIRO Publishing: Collingwood, Victoria)

    Cruz MG, Gould JS, Alexander ME, Sullivan AL, McCaw WL, Matthews S (2015) 'A guide to rate of fire spread models for Australian vegetation.' (Australasian Fire and Emergency Service Authorities Council Limited and Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation)

  • Subject notes

    This subject can be taken as part of the Graduate Certificate in Bushfire Planning and Management.

    The subject involves a week long field trip to the Creswick campus where field and laboratory studies will be undertaken. Students will be expected to make their own way to Creswick for a 9am start on day 1 of the subject. Accommodation is available at the University of Melbourne campus. Students will be asked to contribute to travel, accommodation and food expenses while in the field of week 1.

  • Incidental costs

    Students will be asked to contribute to travel, accommodation and food expenses while in the field.

  • Available through the Community Access Program

    About the Community Access Program (CAP)

    This subject is available through the Community Access Program (also called Single Subject Studies) which allows you to enrol in single subjects offered by the University of Melbourne, without the commitment required to complete a whole degree.

    Entry requirements including prerequisites may apply. Please refer to the CAP applications page for further information.

  • Available to Study Abroad and/or Study Exchange Students

    This subject is available to students studying at the University from eligible overseas institutions on exchange and study abroad. Students are required to satisfy any listed requirements, such as pre- and co-requisites, for enrolment in the subject.

Last updated: 3 April 2019