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Haemato, Neurologic & Global Conditions (VETS90038)

Graduate courseworkPoints: 12.5Online

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Overview

Year of offer2019
Subject levelGraduate coursework
Subject codeVETS90038
Availability
Semester 1 - Online
Semester 2 - Online
FeesSubject EFTSL, Level, Discipline & Census Date

This subject focuses on neurologic, musculo-skeletal, haematological, endocrine, global emergencies and transfusion medicine. This subject will increase understanding of both pathophysiology and clinical aspects of the following conditions; traumatic brain injury, spinal trauma, open fractures, traumatic wounds, burns, hyperthermia, toxicities, coagulopathies, IMHA, IMT, anaphylaxis, diabetes ketoacidosis, Addisonian crisis, and transfusion of red cells and plasma. Both fundamental pathophysiological and clinical aspects of these areas will be covered allowing students to build on knowledge that was acquired as an undergraduate leading to a deeper understanding and improved clinical confidence in these areas. This subject will introduce the cell based model of coagulation, pathophysiological principles of SIRS, sepsis and DIC and discuss the diagnosis and critical care of patients with these conditions.

Intended learning outcomes

At the completion of the subject, students should be able to;

  • apply knowledge of anatomy, physiology, pathology and therapy in order to successfully manage neurologic, musculoskeletal, haematological, endocrine and global emergencies
  • to explain the cell based model of coagulation and how this relates to inflammation
  • describe the pathophysiology of traumatic brain, spinal injury, and global conditions such as SIRS, sepsis, DIC, trauma, hyperthermia, toxicities and anaphylaxis
  • to demonstrate effective assessment and management of global conditions such as SIRS, sepsis, DIC, trauma, burns, hyperthermia, toxicities and anaphylaxis
  • to demonstrated understanding of the pathophysiology, assessment, diagnosis and treatment of Australian snake envenomation, tick paralysis and toad toxicity
  • to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the use of transfusion therapy including appropriate indications, limitations and risks
  • apply the core principles covered in this subject to case studies

Generic skills

On completion of this subject students should have developed:

  • problem-solving skills
  • analytic skills
  • increased confidence in tackling unfamiliar problems
  • the capacity to manage competing demands on time

Eligibility and requirements

Prerequisites

To enrol in this subject, you must be admitted in the Graduate Certificate in Small Animal Emergency and Critical Care. This subject is not available for students admitted in any other courses.

Corequisites

None

Non-allowed subjects

None

Recommended background knowledge

Experience in small animal veterinary practice.

Core participation requirements

The University of Melbourne is committed to providing students with reasonable adjustments to assessment and participation under the Disability Standards for Education (2005), and the Assessment and Results Policy (MPF1326). Students are expected to meet the core participation requirements for their course. These can be viewed under Entry and Participation Requirements for the course outlines in the Handbook.

Further details on how to seek academic adjustments can be found on the Student Equity and Disability Support website: http://services.unimelb.edu.au/student-equity/home

Assessment

Description

  • Self-assessment by multiple choice questions, 10 MCQ for each of 10 tutorials, takes 20 minutes - 200 minutes total - following each tutorial and one prior to subject completion, (20%)
  • 50 MCQ open book examination, takes 100 minutes, during exam week, (50%). To pass this examination, a minimum mark of 70% is required.
  • Interpretation of 25 case studies assessed by structured questions pertaining to each case - 5 MCQ per case - total time is 250 minutes, throughout the semester, (30%)

Dates & times

Time commitment details

170 hours per 12.5 credit point subject

Additional delivery details

The online contact hours include;

  • online tutorials
  • online lectures
  • exercises
  • webinars

Further information

  • Texts

    Prescribed texts

    Small Animal Critical Care Medicine 2 nd Ed. By Silverstein and Hopper

    Students will be provided with additional reading material online.

  • Available through the Community Access Program

    About the Community Access Program (CAP)

    This subject is available through the Community Access Program (also called Single Subject Studies) which allows you to enrol in single subjects offered by the University of Melbourne, without the commitment required to complete a whole degree.

    Entry requirements including prerequisites may apply. Please refer to the CAP applications page for further information.

Last updated: 14 August 2019