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Graduate Diploma in Psychology (340AA)

Graduate DiplomaYear: 2019 Delivered: On Campus (Parkville)

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Overview

Award titleGraduate Diploma in Psychology
Year & campus2019 — Parkville
CRICOS code061720G
Fees informationSubject EFTSL, level, discipline and census date
Study level & typeGraduate Coursework
AQF level 8
Credit points125 credit points
Duration12 months full time or 36 months part time

Taught at the University of Melbourne since the 1800’s, psychology is a broad and intellectually stimulating scientific discipline that informs our understanding of human behaviour and experience from neural foundations to complex social interactions. Study in psychology prepares graduates for a diverse range of careers that are based on understanding human behaviour, including health, education, industry, commerce, welfare and government. More broadly, graduates are prepared to engage actively with philosophical, ethical and moral questions that are related to human behaviour.

The Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences’ Graduate Diploma in Psychology is designed for graduates of other disciplines who may be interested in changing career direction and eventually qualifying as a registered psychologist, or for those who wish to study psychology simply out of interest in the discipline.

The course is accredited by the Australian Psychology Accreditation Council (APAC), providing the required foundational sequence of subjects for students wishing to undertake further study in psychology to pursue a career as a registered psychologist. An accredited foundational program in psychology is also the recommended pathway for students who wish to pursue a career as a researcher in psychology.

The course is comprised of 125 credit points of psychology subjects, including eight compulsory psychology subjects (100 credit points), and two elective psychology subjects at Level 3, selected from a range of electives (25 credit points).

Graduate Diploma in Psychology students undertake most of the same subjects and attend most of the same classes as students completing the accredited undergraduate major in Psychology, with the exception of two compulsory advanced level subjects that replace the two compulsory Level 3 subjects in the undergraduate major. The two advanced level subjects recognise the graduate status of the students and specify learning outcomes consistent with an AQF Level 8 qualification, particularly in relation to research methods and communication skills.

The accredited sequence provides a strong grounding in core psychological concepts and theories in the areas of biological, cognitive, developmental, social, and clinical psychology, with reference to both the historical foundations of the discipline and to the latest cutting-edge research. The range of electives subjects in the final year provide the opportunity to develop in-depth knowledge in at least one domain of interest.

The academic staff are internationally renowned researchers in their fields who guide students to develop advanced skills in critical thinking, scientific reasoning, psychological research design, data analysis and the application of research findings to a range of contexts. In addition, students develop their ethical reasoning skills and an awareness of and respect for the diversity of human experiences.

The Graduate Diploma culminates in the Level 3 Capstone subject in which students pursue their own research project in small teams under the supervision of a member of academic staff.

The Graduate Diploma in Psychology has been designed to enable flexible study options. Students can complete the entire 125 credit point accredited sequence of subjects in one year, full-time. Or, students can undertake the course part-time over a period of up to six semesters. Students wishing to complete the course in one year full-time complete the two required Level 100 subjects in an intensive Summer Term and then enrol in the remainder of the course full-time over the following two semesters.

Entry requirements

1. In order to be considered for entry, applicants must have completed:

  • an undergraduate degree with a major other than Psychology, or equivalent.

Meeting this requirement does not guarantee selection.

2. In ranking applications, the Selection Committee will consider:

  • prior academic performance.

3. The Selection Committee may seek further information to clarify any aspect of an application in accordance with the Academic Board rules on the use of selection instruments.

4. Applicants are required to satisfy the university’s English language requirements for postgraduate courses. For those applicants seeking to meet these requirements by one of the standard tests approved by the Academic Board, performance band 6.5 is required.

A mid-year intake is available for part-time students only. Graduates who apply and are selected for mid-year intake should note that their sequence of study will be different to those students who begin in the first semester. Applicants for mid-year entry will need to discuss their course plan with the Department prior to enrolling in the Graduate Diploma in Psychology.

Core participation requirements

The Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences welcomes applications from students with disabilities. It is University and Faculty policy to take all reasonable steps to enable the participation of students with disabilities and reasonable adjustments will be made to enhance a student's participation in the Department's programs.

Students must possess behavioural and social attributes that enable them to participate in a complex learning environment. Students are required to take responsibility for their own participation and learning. They also contribute to the learning of other students in collaborative learning environments, demonstrating interpersonal skills and an understanding of the needs of other students. Assessment may include the outcomes of tasks completed in collaboration with other students.

The inherent academic requirements for study in Psychology are:

  • The ability to comprehend complex disciplinary and interdisciplinary information related to the courses taught in the Faculty.
  • The ability to clearly and independently communicate a knowledge and application of behavioural and social sciences principles and practices during assessment tasks.
  • The ability to actively and safely contribute to laboratory-based learning activities.

Students who feel their disability will prevent them from participating in tasks involving these inherent academic requirements are encouraged to contact the Disability Liaison Unit.

Professional accreditation

The Graduate Diploma in Psychology is accredited by the Australian Psychological Accreditation Council (APAC) as the equivalent of an undergraduate Psychology major.

Intended learning outcomes

Graduate Diploma of Psychology graduates should demonstrate the following learning outcomes:

1. Knowledge

1.1. Psychological Knowledge

A broad understanding and application of the foundations of psychological science, with in-depth knowledge of underlying principles, theoretical perspectives, research methodologies, empirical findings, and historical trends of the discipline.

 

1.2 Ethical understanding and reasoning

A broad understanding of ethical principles and reasoning in psychological research and practice, with reference to the Australian Psychological Society Code of Ethics and NHMRC National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research.

 

1.3. Cultural and social awareness

An awareness of and sensitivity to the diversity of human experiences and cultures and the influence of these on psychological functioning and development, with specific reference to the experiences and cultures of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

 

2. Skills

2.1. Scientific Enquiry and Critical Thinking

The self-directed pursuit of scholarly inquiry, scientific reasoning, problem solving, and research skills to enable investigation, analysis, and critique of the key factors underpinning behaviour and psychological processes.

 

2.2 Communication of psychological knowledge

An advanced ability to articulate cogent scientific explanations of psychological concepts, theories and research findings, and to communicate these ideas effectively to professional and lay audiences in both written and oral formats.

 

3. Application of Knowledge and Skills

3.1 Develop personal, interpersonal, and professional skills.                                                                                                                                        

The ability to apply psychological knowledge to develop self-awareness and personal integrity, including:

  • respect for the diversity of people and peoples
  • working effectively with people from diverse backgrounds
  • giving and receiving feedback
  • promoting and maintaining the wellbeing of self and others.

 

3.2 Address real-world problems.

An advanced ability to analyse and evaluate psychological theories and concepts to:

  • explain how evidence-based psychological interventions can help address contemporary local, national and global issues
  • design a research project to investigate a psychological question.

Generic skills

Upon completion of the Graduate Diploma in Psychology students should have developed the skills to:

  • apply research and inquiry skills to challenges in workplaces and communities;
  • create novel ideas by critically evaluating alternative possibilities and viewpoints;
  • set their own goals, manage their time and priorities, and organise and direct their own learning;
  • work effectively, both independently and collaboratively;
  • provide evidence beyond personal opinion to support proposed solutions to problems;
  • articulate and demonstrate a high regard for human rights, social inclusion, cultural diversity, ethics and the environment;
  • reflect critically and apply skills in self and peer assessment; maintain a high-level of personal and professional integrity.

Graduate attributes

The Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences' Graduate Diploma in Psychology prepares graduates who are distinguished by their breadth and depth of psychological knowledge, research and inquiry skills, and their ability to apply these to inform questions relating to human behaviour. Graduate Diploma in Psychology graduates demonstrate:

Academic distinction

  • In-depth knowledge of psychological science with a broad understanding of its multiple perspectives, spanning the neural to societal levels.
  • Critical, creative thinking with strong reasoning skills. They can apply psychological knowledge, information and research skills to complex problems relating to human behaviour, psychological processes, and behavioural change.
  •  Effective oral and written communication skills for explaining, and evaluating psychological theories, processes, and concepts.
  • They are adept lifelong learners who generate bold and novel ideas by critically evaluating alternative possibilities and viewpoints.

     

Active citizenship

  • A high regard for human rights, social inclusion, ethics and the environment.
  • An awareness of the social and cultural diversity in communities and can work collaboratively with people from diverse linguistic and cultural backgrounds.
  • In particular, they have an understanding of and deep respect for Indigenous knowledge, culture and values.
  • They are equipped to be active, well-informed citizens who make substantial contributions to society, and have the potential to become leaders in their professions and communities.

     

Integrity and self-awareness

  • Self-direction, with the ability to set goals and manage time and priorities.
  • The ability to work effectively both independently and in groups.
  • Skills in self-assessment, reflective thinking and self-awareness; placing great importance on their personal and professional integrity, and on the willingness to explore, experiment and learn from mistakes.
  • Empathy and concern for the welfare of others and have developed skills in managing their own well-being.

Course structure

The Graduate Diploma in Psychology involves the completion of ten Psychology subjects that are equivalent to an APAC accredited Psychology major.

To qualify for the Graduate Diploma students must complete 100 points (eight subjects) of core subjects and 25 points (two subjects) of elective subjects.

Subject options

Part-time course requirements

Students enrolled in the part-time Graduate Diploma complete the course over two or three years, completing the following core subjects, plus two third-year elective subjects from the elective list below.

Code Name Study period Credit Points
PSYC10003 Mind, Brain & Behaviour 1
Semester 1
12.5
PSYC10004 Mind, Brain and Behaviour 2
Semester 2
12.5
PSYC20006 Biological Psychology
Semester 1
12.5
PSYC20008 Developmental Psychology
Semester 1
12.5
PSYC20007 Cognitive Psychology
Semester 2
12.5
PSYC20009 Personality and Social Psychology
Semester 2
12.5
PSYC40014 Advanced Research Methods In Psychology
Semester 1
12.5
PSYC40013 Advanced Psychological Theory & Practice
Semester 2
12.5
PSYC90097 Mind, Brain & Behaviour 1
Summer Term
12.5
PSYC90098 Mind, Brain & Behaviour 2
Summer Term
12.5

Full-time course requirements

Students enrolled in the Full-time Graduate Diploma complete the course in one year, including taking the two first-year subjects in the summer semester. They take the core second and third year subjects in first and second semesters, together with two elective subjects from the lower list (one in first semester and one in second semester).

Code Name Study period Credit Points
PSYC20006 Biological Psychology
Semester 1
12.5
PSYC20008 Developmental Psychology
Semester 1
12.5
PSYC20007 Cognitive Psychology
Semester 2
12.5
PSYC20009 Personality and Social Psychology
Semester 2
12.5
PSYC40014 Advanced Research Methods In Psychology
Semester 1
12.5
PSYC40013 Advanced Psychological Theory & Practice
Semester 2
12.5
PSYC90097 Mind, Brain & Behaviour 1
Summer Term
12.5
PSYC90098 Mind, Brain & Behaviour 2
Summer Term
12.5

Elective Subjects

All students, whether completing the Graduate Diploma in part-time or full-time mode, MUST complete two elective subjects in addition to the core subjects listed above. Ideally, one elective should be taken in each semester of the third-year (for part-time students) or in each semester of second- and third-year subjects (for full-time students).

Code Name Study period Credit Points
PSYC30012 The Unconscious Mind
Semester 1
12.5
PSYC30014 The Psychopathology of Everyday Life
Semester 1
12.5
PSYC30015
PSYC30016 Lifespan Social & Emotional Development
Semester 2
12.5
PSYC30017 Perception, Memory and Cognition
Semester 1
12.5
PSYC30018 Neuroscience and the Mind
Semester 1
12.5
PSYC30019 Development of the Thinking Child
Semester 2
12.5
PSYC30020 The Integrated Brain
Semester 2
12.5
PSYC30022 Trends in Personality& Social Psychology
Semester 2
12.5

Further study

In order to become eligible for registration as a Psychologist in Australia, it is necessary to complete an APAC accredited six-year sequence, consisting of an undergraduate major in Psychology (or its equivalent, eg Graduate Diploma), a fourth-year Honours program (or equivalent eg Advanced Graduate Diploma in Psychology) plus a two-year coursework Master's qualification, which includes substantial clinical placement components.

Graduates of the Graduate Diploma are eligible to apply for entry to the Advanced Graduate Diploma of Psychology. Entry to the Advanced Graduate Diploma is by competitive selection and applicants must achieve a minimum grade average over second and third-level subjects of 77%.

Last updated: 18 July 2019