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Bachelor of Oral Health (841AC)

Bachelors DegreeYear: 2019 Delivered: On Campus (Parkville)

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Overview

Award titleBachelor of Oral Health
Year & campus2019 — Parkville
CRICOS code053176D
Fees informationSubject EFTSL, level, discipline and census date
Study level & typeUndergraduate Coursework
AQF level 7
Credit points300 credit points
Duration36 months full time

The Bachelor of Oral Health is a fixed, three-year, full-time program. It has a combined vocational outcome of oral health therapy (dental hygiene and dental therapy) and its curriculum reflects the latest developments in oral health.

The course has four main components:

Dental science: those subjects providing a theoretical background to the procedures used in providing dental care, including the structure and function of normal and abnormal tissues of the body and principles of treatment of disease.

Social science and preventive dentistry: those subjects concerned with preventing dental disease in the community. Community studies and oral health promotion are a major feature of this component, but it also includes ethics, psychology, sociology and research methods.

Clinical dentistry: those subjects related to oral health therapy practice which are common to dental hygienists' and dental therapists' clinical practice. They include infection control, instrumentation, dental materials, examination procedures, record taking, diagnosis and treatment planning, as well as operative procedures such as preventive therapies, fluoride application, orthodontic procedures, impressions and oral radiography.

Vocational clinical practice: in this component the student undertakes clinical management of dental decay in children, adolescents and young adults and the prevention of disease and the conservative management of periodontal conditions for people of all ages. Clinical work is undertaken at the Royal Dental Hospital of Melbourne in all years of the course and at other metropolitan and rural community health centres in the final year of the course. The manual and communication skills needed for clinical dentistry are developed gradually as students progress through the course.

OTHER COSTS – DENTAL INSTRUMENTS: 1st year students are required to purchase dental instruments/equipment early in the first week of the course. The kit costs approximately $4,000 and will provide the required preclinical instruments for the 1st and 2nd years of the BOH program.

Entry requirements

1. In order to be considered for entry, applicants must have completed one of:

a) the Victorian Certificate of Education including

  • VCE Units 3 and 4 – either a study score of at least 25 in one of English, English Language or Literature or a study score of at least 30 in English as an Additional Language, and
  • VCE Units 3 and 4 –a study score of at least 25 in Biology or Chemistry;

b) The International Baccalaureate Diploma including

  • At least Grade 4 in English or English B (Standard Level or Higher Level), and in Biology or Chemistry;

c) A senior secondary program, foundation studies program or equivalent approved by the Academic Board including appropriate English language and Biology or Chemistry studies.

Except for applicants eligible for Access Melbourne, minimum ATAR or equivalent overall performance rankings apply

Meeting these requirements does not guarantee selection.

2. In ranking applications, the Selection Committee will consider:

  • prior academic performance.

3. The Selection Committee may seek further information to clarify any aspect of an application in accordance with the Academic Board rules on the use of selection instruments.

4. For applicants who have not completed the Victorian Certificate of Education or the International Baccalaureate Diploma, the English language requirements for Undergraduate Programs must be met.

Note:

  • The Bachelor of Oral Health has a quota of 36 places available per year.
  • For applications through the Victorian Tertiary Admission Centre, “middle-band” selection adjustments are made only on the basis of eligibility for Access Melbourne.

Core participation requirements

For the purposes of considering request for Reasonable Adjustments under the Disability Standards for Education (Cwth 2005), and Students Experiencing Academic Disadvantage Policy, academic requirements for the BACHELOR OF ORAL HEALTH are articulated in the Course Description, Course Objectives, Generic Skills and Assessment Requirements of this entry.

The University is dedicated to provide support to those with special requirements. Further details on the disability support scheme can be found at the Student Equity and Disability Support website:

http://www.services.unimelb.edu.au/disability/

The Melbourne Dental School policy outlining requirements in relation to student disability for entry to and progression within the BACHELOR OF ORAL HEALTH are outlined below.

Melbourne Dental School Policy in Relation to Students with Disabilities

The curriculum of the BACHELOR OF ORAL HEALTH has been developed using graduate attribute statements in six domains (professionalism, scientific knowledge, patient care, dental profession, systems of health care and the society). Students entering the Melbourne BACHELOR OF ORAL HEALTH must therefore have the aptitude to achieve these attributes during the course.

Compassion, integrity, concern for others, interpersonal skills, interest, insight into the effects of their own behaviour, and motivation are all personal qualities that will be assessed during the admissions and education processes.

The Melbourne Dental School welcomes applications from students with disabilities. It is University and Faculty policy to take all reasonable steps to minimise the impact of disability upon academic study. Appropriate adjustments will be made to enhance the participation of students with a disability in the dental course. A prospective student with a disability is advised to discuss with the staff in the student service centres issues related to his or her ability to successfully meet all the course requirements.

All students of the BACHELOR OF ORAL HEALTH must possess the intellectual, ethical, physical and emotional capabilities required to participate in the full curriculum and to achieve the levels of competence at graduation required by the faculty and the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation agency.

A student with a disability may be asked to provide independent medical or other clinical assessments of the disability and its possible impact on the ability of the student to successfully complete the course, before being accepted into the course. This statement would be treated in confidence with only those on the admissions committee and the Student Equity and Disability Support having access to the document.

Deliberate misinformation about the student’s ability to successfully complete the course will be regarded as unprofessional practice and treated as such.

While the Melbourne Dental School will make reasonable adjustments to minimise the impact of a disability, all students must be able to participate in the program in an independent manner. It is not reasonable for students to use an intermediary as an adjustment to compensate for a disability impacting on any of the five categories. In the clinical environment there is a primary duty of care to the patients and the needs of students cannot compromise this. It is expected that all students will be able to participate fully in all classroom based learning activities and to successfully fulfil the self-study requirements of the course. The presence of a disability will not automatically entitle the student to preferential treatment in clinical place allocation.

A candidate for the Melbourne BACHELOR OF ORAL HEALTH must have abilities and skills in the following five categories:

  • observation;
  • communication;
  • motor;
  • conceptual, integrative, and quantitative;
  • behavioural and social.

I. Observation:

Practical Classes

The student must be able to observe mandatory demonstrations and experiments in the designated subjects.

Clinical Work

The student must be able to observe a patient accurately at a distance and close at hand. Observation necessitates the functional use of the senses of vision, hearing and somatic sensation. It is enhanced by the functional use of the sense of smell.

II. Communication:

Practical Classes

The student must be able to hear and comprehend instructions in laboratories and practical sessions and be able to clearly and independently communicate knowledge and application of the principles and practices of the subject during assessment tasks.

Clinical Work

A student must be able to hear, to speak, and to observe patients in order to elicit information, describe changes in mood, activity, and posture and perceive nonverbal communications. A student must be able to communicate effectively and sensitively with patients in both oral and written modalities. The student must also be able to communicate effectively and efficiently in both oral and written modes with all members of the health care team, including using telephones and computers.

III. Motor:

Practical Classes

A student must be able to undertake the motor requirements for any mandatory practical sessions. Such actions require coordination of both gross and fine muscular movements, equilibrium, and functional use of the senses of touch and vision.

Clinical Work

Students should have good motor function to elicit information from patients by physical examination; for example palpation, percussion, and other diagnostic manoeuvres. Students should possess sufficient manual dexterity to be able to perform procedures required as a dental practitioner. The student should be able to execute motor movements reasonably required to provide general dental care and emergency treatment to patients. Such actions require coordination of both gross and fine muscular movements, equilibrium, hand eye coordination and functional use of the senses of touch and vision.

IV. Intellectual-Conceptual, Integrative and Quantitative Abilities:

Practical Classes

The student is expected to have the ability to develop problem-solving skills and demonstrate this ability in practical sessions. These abilities include measurement, calculation, reasoning, analysis, and synthesis. Problem solving requires all of these intellectual abilities.

Clinical Work

The student is expected to have the ability to develop problem-solving skills and demonstrate the ability to establish oral health care plans and priorities. These abilities include measurement, calculation, reasoning, analysis, and synthesis. Problem solving requires all of these intellectual abilities.

V. Behavioural and Social Attributes:

Practical Classes

A student must possess the emotional health required for full utilization of his/her intellectual abilities, the exercise of good judgement, the prompt completion of all required tasks.

Clinical Work

A student must possess the emotional health required for full utilization of his/her intellectual abilities, the exercise of good judgement, the prompt completion of all responsibilities attendant to the diagnosis and care of patients, and the development of mature, sensitive, and effective relationships with patients and colleagues.

It is a requirement of the course that students will be expected to physically examine their peers (of all genders) in classroom settings and patients (of all genders) in clinics.

Intended learning outcomes

On completion of the course, students should be able to:

1.Be able to:

a)demonstrate appropriate knowledge and skills in primary, secondary and tertiary oral health care including oral examination, diagnosis, treatment planning and clinical therapeutic skills, in orderto practice those aspects of dental therapy and dental hygiene permitted by the legislation governing the practice of dentistry in Australia;

b)relate the scientific basis of health and clinical sciences to the technical and vocational aspects of oral health therapy practice;

c)deliver oral health care in an holistic fashion which takes cognisance of the social, cultural and economic environment in which people live;

d)demonstrate a capacity to design, implement and evaluate preventive interventions at the individual or community level;

e)demonstrate an ability and the confidence to collaborate with all members of the dental team and professionals from other areas such as health, welfare and education;

f)demonstrate an ability to refer patients whose dental care is beyond the scope of the dental hygienist and dental therapist through appropriate referral networks;

g)understand and apply the principles that underpin the ethical codes and legal requirements governing the practice of dentistry;

h)provide care for people that protects their dignity, autonomy, cultural and social values;

i)demonstrate an approach to professional practice incorporating intellectual integrity, self evaluation, development and lifelong learning and a commitment to the oral health therapy community;

2.Have developed:

a)critical, analytical and problem solving skills;

b)the skills to acquire, synthesize and adapt knowledge to a variety of situations;

c)a high level of written and oral communication skills;

d)the capacity for rational inquiry, self directed learning and the integration of new knowledge;

e)the ability to use various mediums to communicate and collaborate with patients and their families;

3.Have the ability:

a)and self confidence to comprehend and respond to complex concepts;

b)to plan work and use time effectively;

4.Possess the knowledge and skills required to advocate for, and promote, the oral health of individuals and groups in both clinical and community settings, especially disadvantaged individuals and groups;

5.Comprehend the principles of population oral health approaches in the contemporary Australian context.

To perform satisfactorily in the course, students must be able to achieve, at least to a satisfactory level, all of the objectives above.

Generic skills

  • Problem solving and decision making skills;
  • Communication and interpersonal skills;
  • Experience in program design and implementation;
  • Evaluation and advocacy;
  • Planning and time management skills;
  • Capacity and motivation for continuing independent learning;
  • Appreciation of, and sensitivity to, cultural diversity;
  • Leadership skills; and
  • Respect for intellectual integrity and scientific truth.

Graduate attributes

A list of attributes of the Melbourne graduate can be found at: http://www.unimelb.edu.au/about/attributes.html

Course structure

Students in the Bachelor of Oral Health will develop all the technical skills required for practice as Oral Health Therapists (which includes both dental hygienist and dental therapist practice). The course comprises four main components:

  • Oral health sciences;
  • Social sciences and health promotion;
  • Preventive and clinical dentistry; and
  • Vocational and clinical practice.

Subject options

Over the three year program, students will undertake the following subjects:

First Year

Code Name Study period Credit Points
ORAL10001 Society and Health 1A
Semester 1
12.5
ORAL10003 Oral Health Sciences 1A
Semester 1
18.75
ORAL10002 Society and Health 1B
Semester 2
12.5
ORAL10004 Oral Health Sciences 1B
Semester 2
18.75
ORAL10005 Oral Health Practice 1
Year Long
37.5

Second Year

Code Name Study period Credit Points
ORAL20001 Health Promotion 2A
Semester 1
12.5
ORAL20003 Oral Health Sciences 2A
February
12.5
ORAL20002 Health Promotion 2B
Semester 2
12.5
ORAL20004 Oral Health Sciences 2B
Semester 2
12.5
ORAL20005 Oral Health Practice 2
Year Long
50

Third Year

Code Name Study period Credit Points
ORAL30001 Oral Health Therapy Research
Year Long
25
ORAL30002 Oral Health Practice 3
Year Long
75

Last updated: 4 April 2019