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Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (MC-DVETMED) // Attributes, outcomes and skills

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Professional accreditation

The veterinary program at the University of Melbourne is accredited by the Australasian Veterinary Boards Council, the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (London, United Kingdom), and the American Veterinary Medical Association. Accreditation is reviewed on a 7 year cycle for all accredited veterinary schools. The accrediting authorities have been informed of the changes to the degree structure through the customary annual reporting process. A formal review of the program will occur in line with the normal accreditation process.

Intended learning outcomes

The primary aim of the Melbourne DVM curriculum is to graduate highly capable veterinary scientists whose abilities to solve problems, to draw on the substantial body of veterinary knowledge, to interpret evidence, and to make decisions and act upon them within a clear ethical and professional framework embody all of the graduate attributes to which the Faculty aspires.

The DVM curriculum has been developed around five learning domains that describe the student’s progressive acquisition of the graduate attributes of a veterinary scientist. These domains or strands, that traverse all subjects of the DVM program, are:

  • The scientific basis of clinical practice
  • Ethics and animal welfare
  • Biosecurity and population health
  • Clinical skills, and
  • Personal and professional development

Graduates completing the DVM course will:

  • Possess and demonstrate a thorough understanding of contemporary knowledge in all disciplines of veterinary science 
  • Be able to demonstrate their competency in performing the clinical skills expected of a veterinary practitioner 
  • Be able to apply their knowledge and cognitive and technical skills to investigate complex problems, integrate information from a variety of sources, find effective solutions, and communicate and justify those solutions 
  • Possess the cognitive skills and knowledge to critically evaluate the scientific literature and future advances in veterinary science 
  • Have a solid understanding of the principles and methods used to undertake research in veterinary science 
  • Be able to demonstrate the ability to work effectively within the veterinary profession, both independently and as a member of a team
  • Possess and demonstrate superior verbal and written communication skills and the capacity to communicate effectively with other scientists, clients and the general public
  • Demonstrate a habit of self-awareness and be aware of and practise strategies that promote resilience and well-being in veterinary professional life
  • Be cognisant of biosecurity and public health issues in veterinary practice, utilise appropriate biosecurity measures, and know how to respond rapidly and effectively to a zoonotic, notifiable or exotic disease event in domestic or other animals
  • Understand and demonstrate the standards, ethical approach and professional behaviour expected of a veterinarian 
  • Prioritise animal welfare and ethical conduct in all of their veterinary professional activities
  • Possess a commitment to life-long learning and to service to the veterinary profession and the general community

 

Generic skills

The primary aim of the Melbourne DVM curriculum is to graduate highly capable veterinary scientists whose abilities to solve problems, to draw on the substantial body of veterinary knowledge, to interpret evidence, and to make decisions and act upon them within a clear ethical and professional framework embody all of the graduate attributes to which the Faculty aspires.

The DVM curriculum has been developed around five learning domains that describe the student’s progressive acquisition of the graduate attributes of a veterinary scientist. These domains or strands, that traverse all subjects of the DVM program, are:

  • The scientific basis of clinical practice
  • Ethics and animal welfare
  • Biosecurity and population health
  • Clinical skills, and
  • Personal and professional development

The DVM program encourages students to achieve the attributes of all graduates of the University of Melbourne in terms of academic excellence, knowledge acquisition, community leadership and responsibility, cultural sensitivity, and international awareness.

Knowledge

Graduates of the Melbourne DVM will have:

  • An extensive body of contemporary knowledge encompassing all disciplines and aspects of veterinary science
  • A knowledge of research principles and methods applicable to veterinary science and its professional practice

Skills

Graduates of the Melbourne DVM will have:

  • An advanced understanding of concepts, mechanisms and practical skills that underline veterinary science and its professional practice
  • The ability to investigate and seek solutions to complex problems and synthesise information encountered as a veterinary scientist, employing practical skills and the application of knowledge
  • The ability to apply their knowledge and technical skills to evaluate ideas and concepts presented to a veterinary scientist
  • The ability to interpret scientific findings and justify professional decisions through effective communication to clients, colleagues and support staff with empathy and concern for both animals and people
  • The ability to apply their knowledge, practical and communication skills to formulate and implement management strategies for addressing problems encountered as a contemporary veterinary scientist

Application of Knowledge and Skills

Graduates of the Melbourne DVM will demonstrate the application of knowledge and skills:

  • With the ability to adapt to changes in their field of employment and to advancements in veterinary science
  • With the ability to develop intellectual and physical skills in order to initiate and integrate new ideas into veterinary practice
  • With confidence in their veterinary capabilities on day one post-graduation, whilst at the same time recognising the extent of these capabilities and assuming individual professional responsibilities for them
  • By being a graduate of choice for employers
  • By being motivated to be a veterinarian, by being aware of the veterinarian’s place in global society and by being prepared to contribute to and be a leader in the community
  • By completing a professionally focussed research project and participate in a capstone experience

As a Masters level course, the DVM assumes and builds on the prior knowledge and experience in scientific thinking of students entering the course. From the first year of study an integrated and interdisciplinary approach is adopted. Students are expected to appraise data critically, to integrate concepts acquired in different disciplines, and to apply their understanding to authentic cases. They will be provided with opportunities to practise evidence-based decision-making, to solve clinical problems and to acquire clinical competencies in an ordered and sequential way.

The veterinary program at the University of Melbourne is accredited by the Australasian Veterinary Boards Council, the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (London, United Kingdom), and the American Veterinary Medical Association. Accreditation is reviewed on a 7 year cycle for all accredited veterinary schools.

Graduate attributes

The DVM program encourages students to achieve the attributes of all graduates of the University of Melbourne in terms of academic excellence, knowledge acquisition, community leadership and responsibility, cultural sensitivity, and international awareness.

In particular, the Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences intends that graduates of its DVM program should:

  • Be able to seek solutions to problems through the application of knowledge, the ability to initiate and integrate new ideas, an appreciation of the broad picture of science, and an understanding of the importance and application of scientific method
  • Deal with integrity and honesty with professional colleagues, clients and the general public
  • Demonstrate empathy and concern for animals and people
  • Possess an understanding of both scientific and vocational aspects of veterinary science
  • Be motivated to be a veterinarian, aware of the veterinarian’s place in society, and prepared to be a leader in the community
  • Have broad knowledge of veterinary science and be able to develop intellectual and physical skills as circumstances dictate
  • Be trained in all disciplines and aspects of veterinary science
  • Be adaptable to changes in their specific field of employment and to advancements in veterinary science in general
  • Be confident in their veterinary capabilities on day one post-graduation whilst recognising the limitations of their training
  • Be aware of the global society and equipped to contribute to it
  • Be a graduate of choice for employers.

As a Masters level course, the DVM assumes and builds on the prior knowledge and experience in scientific thinking of students entering the course. From the first year of study, an integrated and interdisciplinary approach is adopted. Students are expected to appraise data critically, to integrate concepts acquired in different disciplines, and to apply their understanding to authentic cases. They will be provided with opportunities to practise evidence-based decision-making, to solve clinical problems and to acquire clinical competencies in an ordered and sequential way.