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Australian Environmental Philosophy (AIND20010)

Undergraduate level 2Points: 12.5On Campus (Parkville)

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Overview

Year of offer2018
Subject levelUndergraduate Level 2
Subject codeAIND20010
Campus
Parkville
Availability
Semester 2
FeesSubject EFTSL, Level, Discipline & Census Date

This subject considers progressive developments that are being generated through Indigenous and non-Indigenous dialogue and intersections in the context of Australian environmental thought. Students will critique and reconsider aspects of dominant Western ways of knowing and understanding, particularly deep-rooted assumptions surrounding the 'nonhuman'. Students will gain awareness of how these assumptions shape our lives and relationships with the world, and will examine connections between epistemology, life practices and environmental ethics. Through a study of Australian Indigenous and non-Indigenous environmental thinkers, and drawing from Indigenous and non-Indigenous relationships with the land, students will think about ethical, social and political issues in relation to the ecology.

Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this subject, students should have:

  • an understanding of major historical developments in modern Western epistemology and their ethical consequences;
  • an understanding of the relationship between epistemology and life practices, in the context of Australian society;
  • an understanding of the work of leading Australian ecophilosophers, and a grasp of new areas in environmental ethics;
  • an understanding of the connections between ecophilosophy and Indigenous philosophy, and the unique potential increasing dialogue in this context could offer Australia, its country and people;
  • the ability to engage in an informed and reasonable discussion of ideas and issues, including those involving sensitivities, that relate to the Aboriginal and Settler communities; and
  • applied critical and analytical skills and methods to an independent research project, which communicates complex ideas clearly and comprehensively.

Generic skills

At the completion of this subject, students should gain the following generic skills:

  • a developed understanding of relevant critical theories and methods and make informed decisions about their use and application in relation to Indigenous subject matter;
  • the ability to work effectively as an individual and member of class in producing new learning outcomes;
  • engagement in high-level use of a wide range of research applications and resources and make informed decisions in respect to their usage;
  • the ability to engage in an informed and reasonable discussion of ideas and issues, including those involving sensitivities, that relate to the Aboriginal and Settler communities; and
  • the ability to produce high quality written material that encompasses the complexities and sensitivities of Australian Indigenous Studies.

Last updated: 14 December 2017