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Ethnic Nationalism and the Modern World (ANTH20011)

Undergraduate level 2Points: 12.5On Campus (Parkville)

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Overview

Year of offer2019
Subject levelUndergraduate Level 2
Subject codeANTH20011
Campus
Parkville
Availability
Semester 2
FeesSubject EFTSL, Level, Discipline & Census Date

Ethnicity and nationalism are of special concern to anthropologists, especially in instances where anthropology becomes part of nationalist discourse. This subject considers ethnicity and nationalism through the in-depth analysis of a case study from the developing world, but draws on comparative material from Africa, the Americas, Asia, Australia, Europe and the Pacific. Students will examine different theoretical approaches to ethnicity, nationalism and ethnic nationalism, in particular the relationships between the formation of nation states and processes of 'development', 'transition' and 'underdevelopment'; the roles of actors, from political actors to ordinary people, in the construction of national projects; the relationships between historic and contemporary processes in the construction of national projects; how national projects are constructed, enforced and culturally maintained and the relationships between globalisation, migration, transnationalism and ethnic nationalism in the modern world.

Intended learning outcomes

On completion of this subject students should:

  • Show an understanding of core theoretical approaches to the understanding of ethnicity, nationalism and ethnic nationalism;
  • Show an ability to apply and critically assess theories of ethnicity, nationalism and ethnic nationalism in relation to empirical case studies;
  • Show an understanding of the relationships between the formation of nation states and processes of development, transition and underdevelopment;
  • Show an understanding of the respective roles of different actors, from political actors to ordinary people, in the construction of national projects;
  • Be able to work collaboratively with peers;
  • Show an understanding of the relationships between globalization, migration, trans-nationalism and ethnic nationalism in the modern world;
  • Show an understanding of the relationships between historic and contemporary processes in the construction of national projects;
  • Show an ability to identify and critically assess the implicitly ethnic nationalist content in anthropological and other social scientific writing;
  • Be able to communicate effectively in a variety of written and oral formats.

Eligibility and requirements

Prerequisites

None

Corequisites

None

Non-allowed subjects

None

Recommended background knowledge

Knowledge gained in completing one of ANTH10001 or DEVT10001 or and Arts IDF subject.

Code Name Teaching period Credit Points
ANTH10001 Anthropology: Studying Self and Other
Semester 1
12.5
DEVT10001 The Developing World
Semester 1
12.5

Core participation requirements

The University of Melbourne is committed to providing students with reasonable adjustments to assessment and participation under the Disability Standards for Education (2005), and the Assessment and Results Policy (MPF1326). Students are expected to meet the core participation requirements for their course. These can be viewed under Entry and Participation Requirements for the course outlines in the Handbook.

Further details on how to seek academic adjustments can be found on the Student Equity and Disability Support website: http://services.unimelb.edu.au/student-equity/home

Assessment

Additional details

  • 1000-word (25%) Area Report. Due Week 5 of Semester.
  • 1000-word (25%) Case Study. Due Week 10 of Semester.
  • Group Presentation. Equivalent to 500-words (12.5%) per each group member. Due Week 12 of Semester.
  • 1500-word (37.5%) Research Essay. Due during the examination period.

Hurdle requirement: Students must attend a minimum of 75% of tutorials in order to pass this subject. All pieces of written work must be submitted to pass this subject. Regular participation in tutorials is required.

Note: Assessment submitted late without an approved extension will be penalised at 10 marks per working day. In-class tasks missed without approval will not be marked.

Dates & times

  • Semester 2
    CoordinatorOrhan Karagoz
    Mode of deliveryOn Campus — Parkville
    Contact hoursA 2-hour lecture and a 1-hour tutorial per week for 10 weeks. The Lecture and Tutorial programs are staggered and cover the 12 weeks of semester.
    Total time commitment170 hours
    Teaching period29 July 2019 to 27 October 2019
    Last self-enrol date 9 August 2019
    Census date31 August 2019
    Last date to withdraw without fail27 September 2019
    Assessment period ends22 November 2019

    Semester 2 contact information

Time commitment details

170 hours

Further information

Last updated: 11 October 2019