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Biology of Australian Flora & Fauna (BIOL10001)

Undergraduate level 1Points: 12.5On Campus (Parkville)

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Overview

Year of offer2019
Subject levelUndergraduate Level 1
Subject codeBIOL10001
Campus
Parkville
Availability
Semester 2
FeesSubject EFTSL, Level, Discipline & Census Date

This subject will include the natural history of Australia from the Cretaceous to the present, and the influence of Australian Aborigines and Europeans; Australian environments, climatic zones, major biomes; terrestrial biota: diversity, endemism and biology of Australian plants, relictual rainforests, sclerophylly, adaptation to fire, diversity, endemism and biology of unique habitats, low nutrients and aridity; diversity, endemism and biology of vertebrate fauna including amphibians and marsupials; marine environments, algae, invertebrates, reefs, mangrove communities, inland waterbodies; and ecology, conservation, and management of Australian ecosystems.

Intended learning outcomes

By the end of this subject students should have

  • knowledge of the evolutionary history of the Australian biota, and the influence of past changes in geology, climate and soil;
  • an appreciation of the great diversity and genetic resources of the Australian biota;
  • knowledge of the structure and physiology of native plants and animals in relation to surviving in Australian environments;
  • an understanding of the impact of humans on Australian ecosystems and issues of conservation biology; and
  • skills to improve their self-study, analysis and evaluation of biological information.

Generic skills

This subject encompasses particular generic skills so that on completion of this subject students should have developed skills relating to:

  • the organization of work schedules which permit appropriate preparation time for tutorials, practical classes and examinations;
  • the use of electronic forms of communication and the discerning use of the web for seeking information;
  • accessing information from the library employing both electronic and traditional means;
  • working collaboratively with other students in tutorials and workshops;
  • self-study and analysis and evaluation of biological information; and
  • written communication.

Eligibility and requirements

Prerequisites

None

Corequisites

None

Non-allowed subjects

None

Core participation requirements

The University of Melbourne is committed to providing students with reasonable adjustments to assessment and participation under the Disability Standards for Education (2005), and the Assessment and Results Policy (MPF1326). Students are expected to meet the core participation requirements for their course. These can be viewed under Entry and Participation Requirements for the course outlines in the Handbook.

Further details on how to seek academic adjustments can be found on the Student Equity and Disability Support website: http://services.unimelb.edu.au/student-equity/home

Assessment

Description

Submission of two activities from the self-study program, each having a maximum of 1000 words due during the semester (25%); a 50-minute online multiple choice test held mid semester (15%); a 3-hour written examination in the examination period (60%).

Dates & times

  • Semester 2
    CoordinatorsLisa Godinho and Mike Bayly
    Mode of deliveryOn Campus — Parkville
    Contact hours3 x one hour lectures per week, 10 self-study activities and 6 one-hour tutorials during the semester.
    Total time commitment170 hours
    Teaching period29 July 2019 to 27 October 2019
    Last self-enrol date 9 August 2019
    Census date31 August 2019
    Last date to withdraw without fail27 September 2019
    Assessment period ends22 November 2019

Time commitment details

Estimated total time commitment of 170 hours

Further information

  • Texts

    Prescribed texts

    R B Knox, P Y Ladiges, B K Evans and R Saint, Biology, An Australian Focus. 5th Ed, McGraw-Hill, 2014

  • Subject notes

    This subject is available for science credit to students enrolled in the BSc (both pre-2008 and new degrees), BASc or a combined BSc course.

    This subject is a joint botany and zoology subject.

  • Breadth options
  • Available through the Community Access Program

    About the Community Access Program (CAP)

    This subject is available through the Community Access Program (also called Single Subject Studies) which allows you to enrol in single subjects offered by the University of Melbourne, without the commitment required to complete a whole degree.

    Entry requirements including prerequisites may apply. Please refer to the CAP applications page for further information.

  • Available to Study Abroad and/or Study Exchange Students

    This subject is available to students studying at the University from eligible overseas institutions on exchange and study abroad. Students are required to satisfy any listed requirements, such as pre- and co-requisites, for enrolment in the subject.

Last updated: 16 February 2019