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Biology of Cells and Organisms (BIOL10004)

Undergraduate level 1Points: 12.5On Campus (Parkville)

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Overview

Year of offer2019
Subject levelUndergraduate Level 1
Subject codeBIOL10004
Campus
Parkville
Availability
Semester 1
FeesSubject EFTSL, Level, Discipline & Census Date

This objective of this subject is to familiarise students with modern concepts of cell and organismal biology, including structure and function of multicellular organisms including cell function, systems involved in energy transformations, nutrition, water uptake, excretion, gas exchange, circulation, and immune responses; plant and animal reproduction and development; mechanisms involved in responsiveness and coordination: hormonal control in plants and animals, and nervous systems in animals; and animal movement and behaviour.

Intended learning outcomes

At the completion of this subject, students should:

  • be aware of the basic processes of life.
  • be familiar with the structure and function of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.
  • understand the cellular processes for harvesting energy: respiration and photosynthesis.
  • have a basic knowledge of the structure and function of plants, plant growth, reproduction and defence mechanisms.
  • understand that multicellularity in animals depends on homeostasis.
  • have a basic knowledge of animal structure and function of digestion, circulation, respiration, excretion, reproduction, immune system, nervous and endocrine systems.
  • have a basic knowledge of stem cells and their therapeutic potential.
  • understand the evolutionary processes that bring about biological diversity, and the ecological interactions that have shaped particular adaptations.
  • appreciate the different approaches to the study of animal behaviour, and understand how and why animals behave the way they do.
  • understand the relationships between tissues and organs in the whole animal and appreciate how and why organisms are studied.
  • have developed skills in laboratory procedures such as correct use of microscopes; recording observations; hypothesis testing; data analysis, presentation and interpretation.

Generic skills

At the completion of this subject, students should:

  • be able to critically assess and assimilate new knowledge to use these skills to solve problems
  • be able to complete basic manipulations with laboratory equipment
  • develop skills in recording observations, analysis and interpretation of data, and dissection techniques.
  • be able to work in small groups.

Eligibility and requirements

Prerequisites

None

Corequisites

None

Non-allowed subjects

Credit cannot be gained for this subject and any of

Code Name Teaching period Credit Points
BIOL10002 Biomolecules and Cells
Semester 1
12.5

Core participation requirements

The University of Melbourne is committed to providing students with reasonable adjustments to assessment and participation under the Disability Standards for Education (2005), and the Assessment and Results Policy (MPF1326). Students are expected to meet the core participation requirements for their course. These can be viewed under Entry and Participation Requirements for the course outlines in the Handbook.

Further details on how to seek academic adjustments can be found on the Student Equity and Disability Support website: http://services.unimelb.edu.au/student-equity/home

Assessment

Description

  • work related to practical classes during the semester with a combination of assessment of practical skills within the practical class, completion of 4 or 5 on-line pre-practical tests; written work within the practical not exceeding 500 words; and 2 or 3 short multiple choice tests (25%);
  • completion of regular tests on e-learning and skill workshop activities spaced at approximately fortnightly intervals throughout the semester, (3-4% each; total 20%);
  • a written assignment not exceeding 500 words (5%),
  • a 3 hour examination on theory and practical work in the examination period (50%).

Satisfactory completion of practical work is necessary to pass the subject (i.e. an 80% attendance at the practical classes together with a result for the assessed practical work of at least 50%). A pass (50%) on the examination is also necessary to pass the subject.

Dates & times

  • Semester 1
    Principal coordinatorDawn Gleeson
    Mode of deliveryOn Campus — Parkville
    Contact hours2 x one hour lectures per week, a 1 hour tutorial per week, 2 hours of practical work per fortnight, a 1 hour skills workshop per fortnight and 4 hours per week of e-learning activities, independent learning tasks, pre lecture activities, skills workshop activities and post laboratory activities.
    Total time commitment170 hours
    Teaching period 4 March 2019 to 2 June 2019
    Last self-enrol date15 March 2019
    Census date31 March 2019
    Last date to withdraw without fail10 May 2019
    Assessment period ends28 June 2019

    Semester 1 contact information

Time commitment details

Estimated total time commitment of 170 hours

Additional delivery details

This subject requires all students to actively and safely participate in laboratory activities.

Further information

  • Texts

    Prescribed texts

    Knox R B , Ladiges P Y, Evans B K and Saint R , Biology, An Australian Focus 5th Ed, McGraw-Hill, 2014

  • Subject notes

    This subject is available for science credit to students enrolled in the BSc (both pre-2008 and new degrees), BASc or a combined BSc course.

    Many second year subjects require the completion of this subject and BIOL10005 Genetics & the Evolution of Life.

    This subject involves the use of animals that form an essential part of the learning objectives for this subject. Please note: There are some non-dissection alternatives for those who have strong philosophical objections and these and other alternatives can be discussed with the subject co-ordinator.

    Required equipment - laboratory coat.

  • Breadth options
  • Available through the Community Access Program

    About the Community Access Program (CAP)

    This subject is available through the Community Access Program (also called Single Subject Studies) which allows you to enrol in single subjects offered by the University of Melbourne, without the commitment required to complete a whole degree.

    Entry requirements including prerequisites may apply. Please refer to the CAP applications page for further information.

  • Available to Study Abroad and/or Study Exchange Students

    This subject is available to students studying at the University from eligible overseas institutions on exchange and study abroad. Students are required to satisfy any listed requirements, such as pre- and co-requisites, for enrolment in the subject.

Last updated: 24 August 2019