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Chemistry: Reactions and Synthesis (CHEM20018)

Undergraduate level 2Points: 12.5On Campus (Parkville)

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Overview

Year of offer2018
Subject levelUndergraduate Level 2
Subject codeCHEM20018
Campus
Parkville
Availability
Semester 1
FeesSubject EFTSL, Level, Discipline & Census Date

This subject covers key concepts associated with the synthesis and design of organic and inorganic molecules, molecular architecture and the energy transformations associated with chemical and physical processes. Topics covered include synthesis of simple polyfunctional organic compounds, thermodynamically controlled reactions of s-, p- and d- block elements and thermodynamics. In the last three weeks of the subject students will be able to choose between lecture modules with a focus on introductory materials chemistry or biological chemistry. These topics have applications in drug discovery, chemical industry, nanotechnology, and energy harnessing through conventional and alternative energy sources.

Intended learning outcomes

Upon completion of this subject students should:

  • have developed an understanding of molecular properties and energetics and be able to apply these concepts to the synthesis of organic and inorganic compounds;
  • know approaches to the synthesis and some reactions of simple polyfunctional organic compounds;
  • be able to distinguish between kinetically and thermodynamically controlled reactions and to apply these concepts to rationalise synthetic transformations;
  • understand basic thermodynamic concepts and the application of these approaches to real solutions, mixtures and phase equilibria;
  • have a knowledge of the main factors controlling the substitution and redox reactions of main group and transition metal elements.

Generic skills

At the completion of this subject students should have developed the following generic skills:

  • the ability to comprehend complex concepts and effectively communicate this understanding to the scientific community and in a manner accessible to the wider community;
  • the ability to analyse and solve abstract technical problems;
  • the ability to connect and apply the learnt concepts to a broad range of scientific problems beyond the scope of this subject;
  • an awareness of advanced technologies;
  • the ability to think and reason logically;
  • the ability to think critically and independently.

Last updated: 23 October 2017