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Calculus 2 (MAST10006)

Undergraduate level 1Points: 12.5On Campus (Parkville)

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Overview

Year of offer2017
Subject levelUndergraduate Level 1
Subject codeMAST10006
Campus
Parkville
Availability
Semester 1
Semester 2
FeesSubject EFTSL, Level, Discipline & Census Date

This subject will extend knowledge of calculus from school. Students are introduced to hyperbolic functions and their inverses, the complex exponential and functions of two variables. Techniques of differentiation and integration will be extended to these cases. Students will be exposed to a wider class of differential equation models, both first and second order, to describe systems such as population models, electrical circuits and mechanical oscillators. The subject also introduces sequences and series including the concepts of convergence and divergence.

Calculus topics include: intuitive idea of limits and continuity of functions of one variable, sequences, series, hyperbolic functions and their inverses, level curves, partial derivatives, chain rules for partial derivatives, directional derivative, tangent planes and extrema for functions of several variables. Complex exponential topics include: definition, derivative, integral and applications. Integration topics include: techniques of integration and double integrals. Ordinary differential equations topics include: first order (separable, linear via integrating factor) and applications, second order constant coefficient (particular solutions, complementary functions) and applications.

 

Intended learning outcomes

Students completing this subject should be able to:

  • calculate simple limits of a function of one variable;
  • determine convergence and divergence of sequences and series;
  • sketch and manipulate hyperbolic and inverse hyperbolic functions;
  • evaluate integrals using trigonometric and hyperbolic substitutions, partial fractions, integration by parts and the complex exponential;
  • find analytical solutions of first and second order ordinary differential equations, and use these equations to model some simple physical and biological systems;
  • calculate partial derivatives and gradients for functions of two variables, and use these to find maxima and minima.

Generic skills

In addition to learning specific skills that will assist students in their future careers in science, they will have the opportunity to develop generic skills that will assist them in any future career path. These include:

  • problem-solving skills: the ability to engage with unfamiliar problems and identify relevant solution strategies;
  • analytical skills: the ability to construct and express logical arguments and to work in abstract or general terms to increase the clarity and efficiency of analysis;
  • collaborative skills: the ability to work in a team; and
  • time-management skills: the ability to meet regular deadlines while balancing competing commitments.

Last updated: 20 June 2017