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The United Nations: Review and Reform (POLS90016)

Graduate courseworkPoints: 12.5On Campus (Parkville)

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Overview

Year of offer2019
Subject levelGraduate coursework
Subject codePOLS90016
Campus
Parkville
Availability
Semester 2
FeesSubject EFTSL, Level, Discipline & Census Date

The subject will examine various dimensions of the conflict between national sovereignty and international interdependence which impinge on the nature and institutions of global governance. It will extend students' knowledge of the diversity of the forms of international governance, and of the purposes, activities, styles of work and governance of international institutions. The subject will explore the rationale and functioning of existing institutions, attempt a rigorous assessment of their effectiveness, of proposals for their reform, and of the gaps in institutional arrangements. Particular attention will be given to the sources of conflicts underlying their difficulties in making decisions and taking action. On completion of the subject students should be better able to discern the forces operating in global institutions, the means through which they work, and to effectively discuss alternative possible reforms.

Intended learning outcomes

On completion of this subject students should:

  • Enable gaining of thorough knowledge of the conflict between national sovereignty and international interdependence which impinge on the nature and institutions of global governance;
  • Increase understanding of the diversity of the forms of international governance and the means by which they contribute to the international rule of law, peaceful resolution of conflict, economic and social development, environmental responsibility, and implementation of human rights;
  • Enable discernment of the forces operating in global institutions, the means through which they work, and evaluation of alternative possible reforms.

Generic skills

On completion of this subject students should:

  • Be able to apply research skills and critical methods to a field of inquiry;
  • Be able to develop persuasive arguments on a given topic;
  • Be able to communicate oral and written arguments and ideas effectively and articulately.

Eligibility and requirements

Prerequisites

None

Corequisites

None

Non-allowed subjects

None

Recommended background knowledge

Politics and International Studies at Undergraduate level

Core participation requirements

The University of Melbourne is committed to providing students with reasonable adjustments to assessment and participation under the Disability Standards for Education (2005), and the Assessment and Results Policy (MPF1326). Students are expected to meet the core participation requirements for their course. These can be viewed under Entry and Participation Requirements for the course outlines in the Handbook.

Further details on how to seek academic adjustments can be found on the Student Equity and Disability Support website: http://services.unimelb.edu.au/student-equity/home

Assessment

Additional details

  • An essay of 2000 words (40%) to be submitted after Week 5 of Semester.
  • An essay of 3000 words (60%) to be submitted at the start of the examination period.
  • Hurdle requirement: Students are required to attend a minimum of 80% of classes in order to pass this subject and regular class participation is expected.

Dates & times

  • Semester 2
    Principal coordinatorJohn Langmore
    Mode of deliveryOn Campus — Parkville
    Contact hours24 contact hours: A 2-hour seminar per week for 12 weeks.
    Total time commitment170 hours
    Teaching period29 July 2019 to 27 October 2019
    Last self-enrol date 9 August 2019
    Census date31 August 2019
    Last date to withdraw without fail27 September 2019
    Assessment period ends22 November 2019

    Semester 2 contact information

Time commitment details

170 Hours.

Further information

Last updated: 2 August 2019