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Animal Structure and Function (ZOOL20005)

Undergraduate level 2Points: 12.5On Campus (Parkville)

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Overview

Year of offer2019
Subject levelUndergraduate Level 2
Subject codeZOOL20005
Campus
Parkville
Availability
Semester 1
FeesSubject EFTSL, Level, Discipline & Census Date

Animals show remarkable diversity in form and function. In this subject you will explore how form and function are related, starting with simple animals like corals and working up to apes and humans. We ask: How are these animals related by evolution? What do they do, and how do they do this? These are the different ‘technologies’ animals have evolved to solve the problem of how to move and feed. In the practicals, you will learn how to classify animals and interpret their features, and develop an understanding of how birds fly, fish feed, worms burrow and parasites infect us.

Intended learning outcomes

Upon completion of this subject students should have an appreciation of the relationship between structure and function in animals, especially the mechanisms involved in locomotion and food capture; skills in dissection of animals and drawing to show structure; an insight into the evolutionary history, diversity and relationships of animal groups, and the unique adaptations of these groups that allow them to occupy diverse habitats and roles in ecosystems.

Generic skills

The subject builds upon generic skills developed in first year level subjects, including the ability to approach and assimilate new knowledge and an ability to use that knowledge to evaluate theories and communicate ideas. Students should also develop skills in the use of observations to pose and answer questions and to solve practical problems. Students should master the terminology of the field and gain experience in using that mastery to access a large body of scientific literature and material. Thus they should develop the ability to critically evaluate questions and issues within any scientific field.

Eligibility and requirements

Prerequisites

EITHER

Both

Code Name Teaching period Credit Points
BIOL10004 Biology of Cells and Organisms
Semester 1
12.5
BIOL10005 Genetics & The Evolution of Life
Semester 2
12.5

OR

Both

Code Name Teaching period Credit Points
BIOL10002 Biomolecules and Cells
Semester 1
12.5
BIOL10003 Genes and Environment
Semester 2
12.5

Corequisites

None

Non-allowed subjects

None

Core participation requirements

The University of Melbourne is committed to providing students with reasonable adjustments to assessment and participation under the Disability Standards for Education (2005), and the Assessment and Results Policy (MPF1326). Students are expected to meet the core participation requirements for their course. These can be viewed under Entry and Participation Requirements for the course outlines in the Handbook.

Further details on how to seek academic adjustments can be found on the Student Equity and Disability Support website: http://services.unimelb.edu.au/student-equity/home

Assessment

Additional details

  • Assessment of laboratory work via 10 x 5 minute online mini quizzes during each practical class throughout the semester (25%);
  • Assessment of essay work (up to 750 words; due weeks 3 - 9, 15%);
  • A 30-minute mid-semester progress test (15%); and
  • A 2-hour written examination during the examination period, covering both lecture and practical material (45%)

Dates & times

  • Semester 1
    CoordinatorsJohn Morrongiello and Alexandra Harvey
    Mode of deliveryOn Campus — Parkville
    Contact hours2 x one hour lectures per week; 10 x three hour practical classes
    Total time commitment170 hours
    Teaching period 4 March 2019 to 2 June 2019
    Last self-enrol date15 March 2019
    Census date31 March 2019
    Last date to withdraw without fail10 May 2019
    Assessment period ends28 June 2019

    Semester 1 contact information

Time commitment details

Estimated total time commitment of 170 hours

Additional delivery details

Lectures and laboratory based practical work.

This subject requires all students to actively and safely participate in laboratory activities.

Further information

  • Texts

    Prescribed texts

    Hickman et al Integrated Principles of Zoology, McGraw Hill

  • Subject notes

    This subject is available for science credit to students enrolled in the BSc (both pre-2008 and new degrees), BASc or a combined BSc course.

  • Breadth options
  • Available through the Community Access Program

    About the Community Access Program (CAP)

    This subject is available through the Community Access Program (also called Single Subject Studies) which allows you to enrol in single subjects offered by the University of Melbourne, without the commitment required to complete a whole degree.

    Entry requirements including prerequisites may apply. Please refer to the CAP applications page for further information.

  • Available to Study Abroad and/or Study Exchange Students

    This subject is available to students studying at the University from eligible overseas institutions on exchange and study abroad. Students are required to satisfy any listed requirements, such as pre- and co-requisites, for enrolment in the subject.

Last updated: 10 August 2019