Handbook

MECM20006 Understanding Australian Media

Credit Points: 12.5
Level: 2 (Undergraduate)
Dates & Locations:

This subject has the following teaching availabilities in 2017:

Semester 1, Parkville - Taught on campus.Show/hide details
Pre-teaching Period Start not applicable
Teaching Period 27-Feb-2017 to 28-May-2017
Assessment Period End 23-Jun-2017
Last date to Self-Enrol 10-Mar-2017
Census Date 31-Mar-2017
Last date to Withdraw without fail 05-May-2017


Timetable can be viewed here.
For information about these dates, click here.
Time Commitment: Contact Hours: Total 30 hours: a 1.5-hour lecture and a 1-hour tutorial/lab session per week.
Total Time Commitment:

170 hours

Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
Recommended Background Knowledge: None
Non Allowed Subjects:

100-222 Understanding Australian Media

Core Participation Requirements:

For the purposes of considering request for Reasonable Adjustments under the disability Standards for Education (Cwth 2005), and Students Experiencing Academic Disadvantage Policy, academic requirements for this subject are articulated in the Subject Description, Subject Objectives, Generic Skills and Assessment Requirements of this entry. The University is dedicated to provide support to those with special requirements. Further details on the disability support scheme can be found at the Disability Liaison Unit website: http://www.services.unimelb.edu.au/disability/

Coordinator

Dr Mark Davis

Contact

davismr@unimelb.edu.au

Subject Overview:

This subject examines Australian media with an emphasis on its political nature and issues of media convergence, citizenship, policy, regulation, ownership, governance and local content. Students are encouraged to actively, and critically, examine their own media use. Drawing on this, and a range of case studies, students will engage with debates about journalism and ethics, the nature of commercial and public media, and the changing shape of news and current affairs. Major topics include advertising, commercial television, public broadcasting, newspapers, online media, talkback radio, and journalism and ethics. On completion of this subject, students should have developed a strong grasp of the major thematic issues influencing Australian media.

Learning Outcomes:

On successful completion of this subject, students should have:

  • the ability to demonstrate a detailed knowledge and critical understanding of historical developments and current issues concerning Australian media;
  • gained a broad understanding of the constituent interest groups in Australian media practice;
  • developed vocational, methodological and analytical skills so as to forge intellectual links between daily media experience and broader theories about Australian media;
  • developed critical perspectives that enable them to identify and engage with a range of media theories, concepts and debates;
  • gained an understanding of how to act as a an informed and critically discriminating media user and citizen; and
  • the ability to work independently and in groups, to develop and effectively communicate substantive understandings of Australian media.
Assessment:
  • A media industry analysis of 2,000 words, 45% (due mid-semester)
  • A research essay of 2,000 words, 45% (due in the examination period)
  • Tutorial participation 10% (marked during semester)
  • Hurdle: This subject has a minimum hurdle requirement of 80% attendance and regular participation in tutorials. Assessment submitted late without an approved extension will be penalised at 10% per day. In-class tasks missed without approval will not be marked. All pieces of written work must be submitted to pass this subject.
Prescribed Texts:

A subject reader will be available.

Breadth Options:

This subject potentially can be taken as a breadth subject component for the following courses:

You should visit learn more about breadth subjects and read the breadth requirements for your degree, and should discuss your choice with your student adviser, before deciding on your subjects.

Fees Information: Subject EFTSL, Level, Discipline & Census Date
Generic Skills:

At the completion of this subject, students should gain the following generic skills:

  • be able to reflect on their own use of media and relate this to broader theoretical issues;
  • be able to critically analyse the role of contemporary media institutions;
  • be able to prepare and present their ideas in both verbal and written mode at an intermediate level and in conformity to conventions of academic presentation; and
  • be able to participate in discussion and group activities and be sensitive to the participation of others.
Links to further information: http://arts.unimelb.edu.au/culture-communication
Notes:

This subject is available to students enrolled in the BA (Media and Communications), BA (Media and Communications)/Bachelor of Commerce and the BA (Media and Communications)/Bachelor of Laws.

Related Majors/Minors/Specialisations: Australian Studies
Graduate Certificate in Arts - Media and Communications
Graduate Diploma in Arts - Media and Communications
Media and Communications

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