Handbook

ABPL30053 Formative Ideas in Architecture

Credit Points: 12.5
Level: 3 (Undergraduate)
Dates & Locations:

This subject has the following teaching availabilities in 2017:

Semester 2, Parkville - Taught on campus.Show/hide details
Pre-teaching Period Start not applicable
Teaching Period 24-Jul-2017 to 22-Oct-2017
Assessment Period End 17-Nov-2017
Last date to Self-Enrol 04-Aug-2017
Census Date 31-Aug-2017
Last date to Withdraw without fail 22-Sep-2017


Timetable can be viewed here.
For information about these dates, click here.
Time Commitment: Contact Hours: 36 hours: 2 hours of lecture and 1 hour of tutorial per week
Total Time Commitment:

170 Hours

Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
Recommended Background Knowledge: None
Non Allowed Subjects: None
Core Participation Requirements:

For the purposes of considering request for Reasonable Adjustments under the Disability Standards for Education (Cwth 2005), and Student Support and Engagement Policy, academic requirements for this subject are articulated in the Subject Overview, Learning Outcomes, Assessment and Generic Skills sections of this entry.

It is University policy to take all reasonable steps to minimise the impact of disability upon academic study, and reasonable adjustments will be made to enhance a student's participation in the University's programs. Students who feel their disability may impact on meeting the requirements of this subject are encouraged to discuss this matter with a Faculty Student Adviser and Student Equity and Disability Support: http://services.unimelb.edu.au/disability

Coordinator

Prof Hannah Lewi

Contact

Email: hlewi@unimelb.edu.au

Subject Overview:

This subject will examine the importance of formative ideas in architecture design, culture, technology. practice and history from the Enlightenment to early Modernism.

The subject will include study of the following themes: enlightenment, the rise of archaeology and neo-classicism; the emerging language of Modernity including the picturesque and revivalism; the industrial revolution and its implications for new modes of engineering and functionalism; the rise of the architecture, landscape and planning professions; designing and documenting the modern metropolis; colonialism and imperialism across the world; visualising the history of architecture.

Architectural precedents will be considered within their social, cultural, environmental and landscape contexts and analysed through concerns such as spatial organisation, technologies and theories of architecture as expressed in key texts and ideas. International influence and exchange will be examined through comparison to Australian and local significant sites and buildings.

Learning Outcomes:

On completion of this subject, students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of key concepts in the history of architecture;
  • Analyse buildings, places and architecture images in terms of their context, form, planning, & theoretical ideas;
  • Demonstrate an understanding of architecture as a form of social representation.
Assessment:
  • One two hour exam at the end of semester (35%);
  • One essay , the essay is an illustrated written essay that reflects research into a selected essay question on a historical topic that relates to the key themes and issues and examples of the subject. The essay requires evidence of argument, research and accuracy of referencing, equivalent to 1600 words due 3rd October 2016 (40%);
  • Tutorial exercises: an illustrated verbal presentation once during semester( not more than 10 minutes) to answer an assigned topic that relates to the subject readings, plus engagement with tutorial discussions and walking tour activity. Due date one tutorial session of choice throughout semester depending on topic selected (25%).

Prescribed Texts:

Subject Reader

Breadth Options:

This subject potentially can be taken as a breadth subject component for the following courses:

You should visit learn more about breadth subjects and read the breadth requirements for your degree, and should discuss your choice with your student adviser, before deciding on your subjects.

Fees Information: Subject EFTSL, Level, Discipline & Census Date
Generic Skills:
  • Analysis of physical artifacts in their historical context.
  • Understanding of history as a discipline and as a process.
  • Understanding of the social, cultural and environmental context of architecture.
  • Familiarity with reading key texts and images in the history of architecture.
  • Writing and presentation skills to undergraduate standard.
  • Use and understanding of architecture terminology.

Related Majors/Minors/Specialisations: Environments Discipline subjects
Landscape Architecture major
Restrictions for Breadth Options within the Bachelor of Environments - relating to specific majors
Urban Design and Planning major
Related Breadth Track(s): Architecture
Architectural History

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