Handbook

PHYC20014 Physical Systems

Credit Points: 12.5
Level: 2 (Undergraduate)
Dates & Locations:

This subject has the following teaching availabilities in 2017:

Semester 2, Parkville - Taught on campus.Show/hide details
Pre-teaching Period Start not applicable
Teaching Period 24-Jul-2017 to 22-Oct-2017
Assessment Period End 17-Nov-2017
Last date to Self-Enrol 04-Aug-2017
Census Date 31-Aug-2017
Last date to Withdraw without fail 22-Sep-2017


Timetable can be viewed here.
For information about these dates, click here.
Time Commitment: Contact Hours: 48 hours comprising 36 hours of lectures and 12 hours tutorials.
Total Time Commitment:

170 Hours

Prerequisites:

One of:

Subject
Study Period Commencement:
Credit Points:
Semester 1
12.5

And one of:

Subject
Study Period Commencement:
Credit Points:

And one of:

Subject
Study Period Commencement:
Credit Points:
Semester 1, Semester 2
12.5

And one of:

Subject
Study Period Commencement:
Credit Points:
Summer Term, Semester 1, Semester 2
12.5

And both of:

Subject
Study Period Commencement:
Credit Points:
Semester 1, Semester 2
12.5

MAST20009 may be taken concurrently.

Corequisites:
Subject
Study Period Commencement:
Credit Points:
Recommended Background Knowledge: None
Non Allowed Subjects: None
Core Participation Requirements:

For the purposes of considering request for Reasonable Adjustments under the Disability Standards for Education (Cwth 2005), and Student Support and Engagement Policy, academic requirements for this subject are articulated in the Subject Overview, Learning Outcomes, Assessment and Generic Skills sections of this entry.

It is University policy to take all reasonable steps to minimise the impact of disability upon academic study, and reasonable adjustments will be made to enhance a student's participation in the University's programs. Students who feel their disability may impact on meeting the requirements of this subject are encouraged to discuss this matter with a Faculty Student Adviser and Student Equity and Disability Support: http://services.unimelb.edu.au/disability

Coordinator

Prof Harry Quiney

Contact

quiney@unimelb.edu.au

Subject Overview:

Fourier series and Fourier transforms are introduced as a means of representing and analysing functions of physical significance. The mathematical principles of Fourier theory are developed within the physical context of Fourier optics, diffraction theory, quantum mechanics and signal processing.

The formulation of Classical Newtonian and Lagrangian mechanics is then discussed in the context of the symmetries of nature, conservation laws, Hamilton's equations and integration of the equations of motion. These principles are applied to the description of physical and mechanical systems and includes a detailed discussion of rotational and oscillatory motion, mechanical stability, collisions, scattering, diffusion and continuum mechanics.

The emphasis in this subject will be to the development of techniques for solving problems involving a wide range of physical systems, including the formulation of appropriate mathematical and computational models and the identification of approximate solutions and limiting cases. Particular emphasis will be placed on the development of techniques that have wide applicability. Illustrative examples of these underlying principles will be drawn from classical and quantum mechanics, electromagnetism and optics, electronics, geophysics, astrophysics, physical chemistry and physical biosciences.

Learning Outcomes:

To challenge students to expand their knowledge of fundamental physics principles and develop their capacity to:

  • explain diffraction physics and solve and analyse simple problems using Fourier transforms and related analytical tools.
  • investigate simple problems in physical systems using the principles of classical Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics, quantum mechanics or electromagnetism and appropriate methods of mathematical analysis.
Assessment:

Three written assignments requiring a total of up to twenty-four hours of work outside class time during the semester to be submitted and assessed early, mid and late semester (30%, 10 for each assignment). A three hour written exam during the examination period (70%).

Prescribed Texts:

Goldstein, Safco, Poole, Classical Mechanics, Pearson New International Edition

Breadth Options:

This subject potentially can be taken as a breadth subject component for the following courses:

You should visit learn more about breadth subjects and read the breadth requirements for your degree, and should discuss your choice with your student adviser, before deciding on your subjects.

Fees Information: Subject EFTSL, Level, Discipline & Census Date
Generic Skills:

A student who completes this subject should be able to:

  • Explain their understanding of physics principles and applications lucidly, both in writing and orally;
  • Describe the experimental and observational basis of the physical principles presented in the subject, both in writing and orally;
  • Participate as an effective member of a group in tutorial discussions and study groups;
  • Think independently and analytically and direct his or her own learning;
  • Manage time effectively in order to be prepared for regular tutorial classes, tests, the examination and to complete assignments.
Related Majors/Minors/Specialisations: Science-credited subjects - new generation B-SCI and B-ENG.
Selective subjects for B-BMED

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