Handbook

UNIB10003 An Ecological History of Humanity

Credit Points: 12.5
Level: 1 (Undergraduate)
Dates & Locations:

This subject has the following teaching availabilities in 2017:

Semester 1, Parkville - Taught on campus.Show/hide details
Pre-teaching Period Start not applicable
Teaching Period 27-Feb-2017 to 28-May-2017
Assessment Period End 23-Jun-2017
Last date to Self-Enrol 10-Mar-2017
Census Date 31-Mar-2017
Last date to Withdraw without fail 05-May-2017


Timetable can be viewed here.
For information about these dates, click here.
Time Commitment: Contact Hours: 35 hours - 2 x 1 hour lectures each week and 1 x 1 hour tutorial for 11 weeks
Total Time Commitment:

170 hours

Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
Recommended Background Knowledge: None
Non Allowed Subjects: None
Core Participation Requirements:

For the purposes of considering request for Reasonable Adjustments under the Disability Standards for Education (Cwth 2005), and Student Support and Engagement Policy, academic requirements for this subject are articulated in the Subject Overview, Learning Outcomes, Assessment and Generic Skills sections of this entry.

It is University policy to take all reasonable steps to minimise the impact of disability upon academic study, and reasonable adjustments will be made to enhance a student's participation in the University's programs. Students who feel their disability may impact on meeting the requirements of this subject are encouraged to discuss this matter with a Faculty Student Adviser and Student Equity and Disability Support: http://services.unimelb.edu.au/disability

Coordinator

Dr James Bradley

Contact

Email: jbradley@unimelb.edu.au

Subject Overview:

An Ecological History of Humanity or "How we got to where we are", journeys through 150,000 years of human experience: climate change, the great migrations, health and disease, famine and plenty, war and peace, scientific and technological advance - to conclude in our own times. This story concentrates on the deep history of human societies and their needs for food, shelter and reproduction, and of our quests for love, meaning and power. It explores key transitions: the emergence of farming and complex societies, the rise and fall of empires, calamities such as the Black Death and the micro and macro-biological conquests of the Americas and Australia, El Nino holocausts and the long cycles of global cooling and warming, the fossil fuel revolution and the urbanization of the world. Taught by a geographer, a zoologist, a microbiologist and an historian, it is an interdisciplinary exploration of our complex relationships with the environment past and present, with other organisms, and with each other.

Learning Outcomes:

Students who successfully complete this subject will:

  • identify, synthesise and analyse relevant materials across a wide range of disciplines, including history, geography, medicine and biology;
  • develop critical and analytical skills, including the ability to form effective arguments;
  • demonstrate the ability to confront and solve unfamiliar problems;
  • develop important life and academic skills, including the ability to precis and undertake analytic note-taking, communication in both written work and tutorials, organisation (including the timely submission of work) and collaboration in the classroom;
  • engage ethically with significant issues in relation to the development human societies and their impact upon the environment.

Assessment:
  • An 800 word book review, due in week 5 (20%)
  • A poster, equivalent to 500 words, due in the final tutorial (12.5%)
  • A 700 word critical reflection on poster, due beginning of the end of semester examination period (17.5%)
  • A 2000 word research report, due during the end of semester examination period (50%)

Hurdle requirement:

  • Students must attend a minimum of 75% of tutorials in order to pass this subject.
  • All pieces of written work must be submitted to pass this subject.

Note: Assessment submitted late without an approved extension will be penalised at 10% per day. After five days late assessment will not be marked. In-class tasks missed without approval will not be marked.

Prescribed Texts:

Clive Ponting: A New Green History of the World (Penguin Books or Viking)

Breadth Options:

This subject potentially can be taken as a breadth subject component for the following courses:

You should visit learn more about breadth subjects and read the breadth requirements for your degree, and should discuss your choice with your student adviser, before deciding on your subjects.

Fees Information: Subject EFTSL, Level, Discipline & Census Date
Links to further information: breadth.unimelb.edu.au/home
Notes:

This subject together with UNIB20013 (Body Mind and Medicine) and UNIB30005 (Living Longer, a global diagnosis) form a recommended medical humanities stream for Medical students.

Related Breadth Track(s): Ecology, Evolution and Humanity
Understanding Nature
Forests and Fire

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