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Transport Processes (CHEN20009)

Undergraduate level 2Points: 12.5On Campus (Parkville)

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Overview

Year of offer2019
Subject levelUndergraduate Level 2
Subject codeCHEN20009
Campus
Parkville
Availability
Semester 1
Semester 2
FeesSubject EFTSL, Level, Discipline & Census Date

AIMS

This subject covers fundamental concepts of diffusion and conservation within momentum, heat and mass transport. Use of these concepts is integral to the profession of Chemical Engineering. For example, heat exchangers are used throughout Chemical Engineering processes to transfer thermal energy from one stream to another. Knowledge of heat transport and momentum transport (ie fluid flow) is required to design key pieces of Chemical Engineering process equipment, including heat exchangers and distillation columns. Similarly, knowledge of mass transport is required to design other key Chemical Engineering processes, including membrane filtration units and other separation processes.

INDICATIVE CONTENT

The specific technical material covered in the course is as follows: Within momentum transport specific topics include Newton’s law of viscosity, viscosity of gases and liquids, conservation of momentum, velocity distributions in simple laminar flows, boundary layer concepts, turbulence and the Reynolds number. Within heat transport specific topics include Fourier’s law of conduction, thermal conductivities of gases, liquids and solids, conservation of thermal energy, steady-state temperature distributions in simple geometries, heat transfer resistance, thermal boundary layer concepts, the Nusselt and Prandtl numbers, definition and use of heat transfer coefficients, and analysis of simple heat exchangers. Within mass transport specific topics include Fick’s first law of diffusion, diffusivities of gases, liquids and solids, binary mixture diffusion and conservation of mass, concentration distributions in simple binary systems (including identifying appropriate boundary conditions), concentration boundary layer concepts, Schmidt and Sherwood numbers, and definition and use of mass transfer coefficients.

Intended learning outcomes

  • Describe the fundamental concepts of momentum, heat and mass transfer
  • Understand the roles of transport processes in chemical and biochemical process equipment
  • Appreciate how material molecular processes affect macroscopic transport properties
  • Formulate transport processes problems relevant to chemical and biochemical systems, deriving the equations that describe these systems and the assumptions that support these equations
  • Perform simple laboratory experiments that deepen and amplify theoretical concepts.

Generic skills

None

Eligibility and requirements

Prerequisites

Undergraduate students:

Students must have completed the following subjects prior to enrolling in this subject:

ONE OF:

  • MAST10019 - Calculus Extension Studies

Code Name Teaching period Credit Points
MAST10006 Calculus 2
Semester 1
Semester 2
12.5
MAST10009 Accelerated Mathematics 2
Semester 2
12.5

AND ONE OF:

  • MAST10018 - Linear Algebra Extension Studies

Code Name Teaching period Credit Points
MAST10007 Linear Algebra
Summer Term
Semester 1
Semester 2
12.5
MAST10008 Accelerated Mathematics 1
Semester 1
12.5

AND

Code Name Teaching period Credit Points
CHEN20010 Material and Energy Balances
Semester 1
Semester 2
12.5

CHEN20010 Material and Energy Balances may be taken concurrently.

OR

Postgraduate students:

Admission to the MC-ENG Master of Engineering (Chemical), (Chemical with Business) or (Biochemical) or (Materials)

AND

Code Name Teaching period Credit Points
CHEN20010 Material and Energy Balances
Semester 1
Semester 2
12.5

CHEN20010 Material and Energy Balances may be taken concurrently.

Corequisites

None

Non-allowed subjects

Code Name Teaching period Credit Points
BMEN30007 Biotransport Processes
Semester 2
12.5

Core participation requirements

The University of Melbourne is committed to providing students with reasonable adjustments to assessment and participation under the Disability Standards for Education (2005), and the Assessment and Results Policy (MPF1326). Students are expected to meet the core participation requirements for their course. These can be viewed under Entry and Participation Requirements for the course outlines in the Handbook.

This subject requires all students to actively and safely participate in laboratory activities. Students who feel their disability may impact upon their participation are encouraged to discuss this matter with the Subject Coordinator and Student Equity and Disability Support.

Further details on how to seek academic adjustments can be found on the Student Equity and Disability Support website: http://services.unimelb.edu.au/student-equity/home

Assessment

DescriptionTimingPercentage
  • Attendance and participation in two laboratory classes each with a written assignment of approximately 250 words (not including equations, graphs and diagrams) in Weeks 3 to 11 each requiring 5 to 7 hours of work including preparation (10% total, 5% each). Intended Learning Outcome (ILO) 5 is addressed in these laboratory classes.
  • 250 words
From week 3 to week 1110%
  • Five written assignments (5% total, 1% each) each of approximately 100 words (not including equations, graphs and diagrams) due between weeks 2 to 12, each requiring 1 to 2 hours of work. ILOs 1 to 4 are addressed in the assignments.
  • 100 words
From week 2 to week 125%
  • One written 90-minute test (15%) held around Week 6. ILOs 1 to 4 are addressed in the test.
  • 90 minutes
From week 5 to week 715%
  • Three-hour exam (70%); held in examination period. All ILOs are addressed in the exam.
  • 3 hours
  • Hurdle requirement: The examination must be passed to pass the subject.
During the examination period70%

Dates & times

  • Semester 1
    Principal coordinatorDalton Harvie
    Mode of deliveryOn Campus — Parkville
    Contact hours36 x 1 hour lectures + 12 x 1 hour tutorials + 2 x 1.5 hours labs
    Total time commitment170 hours
    Teaching period 4 March 2019 to 2 June 2019
    Last self-enrol date15 March 2019
    Census date31 March 2019
    Last date to withdraw without fail10 May 2019
    Assessment period ends28 June 2019

    Semester 1 contact information

    Associate Professor Dalton Harvie

    Email: daltonh@unimelb.edu.au

    and

    Eirini Goudeli

    Email: eirini.goudeli@unimelb.edu.au

  • Semester 2
    Principal coordinatorDalton Harvie
    Mode of deliveryOn Campus — Parkville
    Contact hours36 x 1 hour lectures + 12 x 1 hour tutorials + 2 x 1.5 hours labs
    Total time commitment170 hours
    Teaching period29 July 2019 to 27 October 2019
    Last self-enrol date 9 August 2019
    Census date31 August 2019
    Last date to withdraw without fail27 September 2019
    Assessment period ends22 November 2019

    Semester 2 contact information

    Associate Professor Dalton Harvie

    Email: daltonh@unimelb.edu.au

Time commitment details

170 hours

Further information

  • Texts

    Prescribed texts

    None

    Recommended texts and other resources

    Bird, R.B., Stewart, W.E., and Lightfoot, E.N., Transport Phenomena, second edition, Wiley, 2002 and onwards

    Coulson, J.M., and Richardson, J.F., Chemical Engineering Volume 1, sixth edition, Butterworth-Heinemann, 1999

  • Subject notes

    LEARNING AND TEACHING METHODS

    Lectures are the main mode of technical content delivery for this course. These lectures are supplemented by consultation sessions, in which students work in groups on selected tutorial problems. Practical application of the theory is via two laboratories. Two laboratory experiments will be performed during the semester: in the first, somewhere in weeks 3–6, you will do an experiment called ‘Viscosity’; in the second, somewhere in weeks 8–11, you will do an experiment called ‘Diffusivity’. Each experiment will be conducted in groups of 3, and will take 1.5hrs.

    Students are expected to spend 2-3 hours per hour of lecture time individually working through set problems.

    INDICATIVE KEY LEARNING RESOURCES

    Comprehensive lecture notes are made available prior to the semester commencing (free to download). All lecture slides, handouts and some multimedia material will be made available during the semester through the Learning Management System (LMS).

    Two books are recommended for in-depth study, but not required to purchase (both of these books are available from the library):

    1. Coulson, J.M., and Richardson, J.F., Chemical Engineering, Volume 1, sixth edition, Butterworth-Heinemann, 1999
    2. Bird, R.B., Stewart, W.E., and Lightfoot, E.N., Transport Phenomena, second edition, Wiley, 2002-7 (preferred).

    CAREERS / INDUSTRY LINKS

    This subject introduces fundamental technical concepts and does not have any industrial links. It enables further study of the subject of Chemical Engineering, leading to the analysis of industrially relevant, practical problems.

  • Breadth options
  • Available through the Community Access Program

    About the Community Access Program (CAP)

    This subject is available through the Community Access Program (also called Single Subject Studies) which allows you to enrol in single subjects offered by the University of Melbourne, without the commitment required to complete a whole degree.

    Entry requirements including prerequisites may apply. Please refer to the CAP applications page for further information.

    Additional information for this subject

    Subject coordinator approval required

  • Available to Study Abroad and/or Study Exchange Students

    This subject is available to students studying at the University from eligible overseas institutions on exchange and study abroad. Students are required to satisfy any listed requirements, such as pre- and co-requisites, for enrolment in the subject.

Last updated: 19 July 2019