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  3. Crime and Public Policy

Crime and Public Policy (CRIM30001)

Undergraduate level 3Points: 12.5On Campus (Parkville)

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Overview

Year of offer2019
Subject levelUndergraduate Level 3
Subject codeCRIM30001
Campus
Parkville
Availability
Semester 2
FeesSubject EFTSL, Level, Discipline & Census Date

Many criminology graduates find themselves researching, developing and applying crime policy in government, political and other contexts. This subject helps prepare students for such work. As well as providing an overview of factors shaping policy in Australia and other countries, it reviews challenges associated with making theory relevant in practical contexts. Emphasis is on exploring contemporary issues of public policy such as control of the sex industry, drug law reform, HIV policy, public drunkenness, multiculturalism and the interlinking themes of these public issues. The subject also draws on sociological, psychoanalytic and philosophical theory to help understand opportunities for, and obstacles to, the introduction or reform of public policy. Specific theorists used include Foucault, Zizek, Marx, Butler, Deleuze and poststructural feminist theory. These theorists are used to consider the philosophies that underpin rationales for deciding what is deserving of state intervention and comment as either public policy or criminalization.

Intended learning outcomes

On completion of this subject students should:

  • understand political, economic, social and religious elements affecting crime policy in contemporary Australia;
  • understand challenges associated with trying to apply complex theory in policy contexts;
  • be aware of contemporary debates concerning the modern state, social control and the role of criminal law and criminal justice;
  • be able to analyse and discuss attempts within Australia to reform crime policies;
  • communicate effectively in oral and written formats.

Last updated: 9 November 2018