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Spatial Visualisation (GEOM90007)

Graduate courseworkPoints: 12.5On Campus (Parkville)

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Overview

Year of offer2019
Subject levelGraduate coursework
Subject codeGEOM90007
Campus
Parkville
Availability
Semester 2
FeesSubject EFTSL, Level, Discipline & Census Date

AIMS

Spatial Visualisation is about using and designing effective mechanisms for presenting and exploring the patterns embedded in large and complex data sets. Spatial Visualisation is especially important to spatial decision making, since geographic data sets are both voluminous and rich in structure. By addressing the presentation and interaction with spatial information, this subject complements other topics that deal with the storage and querying of spatial information (e.g. GEOM90018 Spatial Databases), and the processing of spatial information (e.g. GEOM90006 Spatial Analysis). This subject is vital for anyone wishing to work with geographic information systems or spatial databases, or in the area of geographic information science. It will also be of relevance to those with an interest in design, especially graphical and interaction design.

INDICATIVE CONTENT

Fundamentals of information visualisation and data graphics; human perception; foundations of user interface design; cartographic design; geovisualisation; exploratory spatial data analysis; evaluation of visualisation interfaces.

Intended learning outcomes

INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES (ILO)

On completion of this subject the student is expected to:

  1. Understand what makes visualisation of geographic information different from information visualisation in other domains
  2. Critically evaluate the designs of maps and user interfaces for spatial data
  3. Analyse big spatial data sets using geovisualisation techniques, and compare alternative technique.

Generic skills

On successful completion of this subject students should have the:

  1. Ability to apply knowledge of science and engineering fundamentals
  2. Ability to undertake problem identification, formulation, and solution
  3. Ability to communicate effectively, with the engineering team and with the community at large
  4. Capacity for creativity and innovation
  5. Understanding of professional and ethical responsibilities, and commitment to them.

Eligibility and requirements

Prerequisites

Successful completion of the following subject, or equivalent, is required to enrol:

Code Name Teaching period Credit Points
GEOM90008 Foundations of Spatial Information
Semester 1
Semester 2
12.5

Corequisites

None

Non-allowed subjects

None

Core participation requirements

The University of Melbourne is committed to providing students with reasonable adjustments to assessment and participation under the Disability Standards for Education (2005), and the Assessment and Results Policy (MPF1326). Students are expected to meet the core participation requirements for their course. These can be viewed under Entry and Participation Requirements for the course outlines in the Handbook.

Further details on how to seek academic adjustments can be found on the Student Equity and Disability Support website: http://services.unimelb.edu.au/student-equity/home

Assessment

DescriptionTimingPercentage
  • One individual assignment on programming with R, equivalent to a report of 500 words, requiring approximately 12-14 hours work. Addresses the Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs) 1 and 3. Due Week 4 (10%)
  • 13 hours
Week 410%
  • One individual assignment on programming with Processing, equivalent to a report of 500 words, requiring approximately 26-28 hours work. Addresses ILOs 1 and 3. Due Week 8 (20%)
  • 27 hours
Week 820%
  • Mid-semester test of 60 minutes. Addresses ILOs 1-3. Scheduled around Week 9 (25%)
  • 1 hours
Week 925%
  • Group-based deliverable (implementation and description) equivalent to a report of 1000 words per group describing their implementation, requiring approximately 34 hours of work per student. Addresses ILOs 1-3. Groups will consist of about 4 students. Due Week 14 (25%).
  • 34 hours
During the examination period25%
  • Group‐based deliverable (implementation and description) equivalent to a 1‐page individual participation report per student, requiring approximately 13 hours of work. Addresses ILOs 2 and 3. Due Week 14 (10%).
  • 13 hours
During the examination period10%
  • Group-based deliverable (implementation and description) equivalent to a 10 Minute oral presentation of the group project, requiring approximately 13-15 hours of work per student. Addresses ILOs 1-3. Due Week 12 (10%)
  • 1 hours
Week 1214%

Dates & times

  • Semester 2
    Principal coordinatorStephan Winter
    Mode of deliveryOn Campus — Parkville
    Contact hours24 hours of lectures, 24 hours practical work.
    Total time commitment200 hours
    Teaching period29 July 2019 to 27 October 2019
    Last self-enrol date 9 August 2019
    Census date31 August 2019
    Last date to withdraw without fail27 September 2019
    Assessment period ends22 November 2019

    Semester 2 contact information

    Professor Stephan Winter

    winter@unimelb.edu.au

Time commitment details

200 hours

Further information

  • Texts

    Prescribed texts

    Recommended texts and other resources

    • Tufte, E. (2001). The Visual Display of Quantitative Information. Graphics Press.
    • Ward, M., Grinstein, G., and Keim, D. (2010). Interactive Data Visualization: Foundations, Techniques, and Applications. A K Peters.
    • Dykes, J., MacEachren, A., Kraak, M-J. (2005). Exploring Geovisualization. Pergamon.
  • Subject notes

    LEARNING AND TEACHING METHODS

    Lectures will cover the foundation concepts and techniques important to understanding the design and analysis of visual and cartographic data presentation. In practical work, students will gain hands-on experience with a range of visualisation tools and techniques using R. Also other practical development tools, like the Processing language, will be applied to a range of spatial visualisation problems, including an international visualisation challenge.

    INDICATIVE KEY LEARNING RESOURCES

    • Tufte, E. (2001). The Visual Display of Quantitative Information. Graphics Press.
    • Ward, M.; Grinstein, G., and Keim, D. (2010) Interactive Data Visualization: Foundations, Techniques, and Applications. A K Peters.
    • Dykes, J., MacEachren, A., Kraak, M-J. (2005). Exploring Geovisualization. Pergamon.

    CAREERS / INDUSTRY LINKS

    Practical context and industry links are provided in the problem-based learning exercises.

  • Available through the Community Access Program

    About the Community Access Program (CAP)

    This subject is available through the Community Access Program (also called Single Subject Studies) which allows you to enrol in single subjects offered by the University of Melbourne, without the commitment required to complete a whole degree.

    Entry requirements including prerequisites may apply. Please refer to the CAP applications page for further information.

    Additional information for this subject

    Subject coordinator approval required

  • Available to Study Abroad and/or Study Exchange Students

    This subject is available to students studying at the University from eligible overseas institutions on exchange and study abroad. Students are required to satisfy any listed requirements, such as pre- and co-requisites, for enrolment in the subject.

Last updated: 19 July 2019