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Spatial Databases (GEOM90018)

Graduate courseworkPoints: 12.5On Campus (Parkville)

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Overview

Year of offer2019
Subject levelGraduate coursework
Subject codeGEOM90018
Campus
Parkville
Availability
Semester 1
FeesSubject EFTSL, Level, Discipline & Census Date

AIMS

Spatial databases are fundamental to any geographical information system. Efficient and effective representation and retrieval of spatial information is a non-trivial task. This subject will cover the concepts, methods, and approaches that allow for efficient representation, querying, and retrieval of spatial data.

This subject builds on a student’s knowledge of computer programming, databases, and spatial information. Students who successfully complete this subject may find professional employment in designing, implementing, customising and maintaining databases for the increasingly wide range of spatial software applications.

INDICATIVE CONTENT

Fundamentals of spatial databases; spatial data modelling in relational databases, including vector, raster, and network data; spatial operations, including geometric, topological, set-oriented, and network operations; spatial indexes and access methods, including quadtrees and R-trees.

Intended learning outcomes

INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES (ILO)

On completion of this subject the student is expected to:

  1. Describe the need for spatial databases, and the differences between spatial and non-spatial database systems
  2. Describe the design and principles of spatial databases, including techniques for efficiently storing and retrieving spatial data
  3. Design queries for spatial database systems
  4. Use and customize specific spatial database systems.

Generic skills

On successful completion of this subject students should be able to:

  • Apply knowledge of science and engineering fundamentals
  • Undertake problem identification, formulation, and solution
  • Communicate effectively, with the engineering team and with the community at large
  • Manage information and documentation.

Eligibility and requirements

Prerequisites

Successful completion of the following subject is required to enrol:

Code Name Teaching period Credit Points
GEOM90008 Foundations of Spatial Information
Semester 1
Semester 2
12.5

GEOM90008 Foundations of Spatial Information may be taken concurrently

Corequisites

None

Non-allowed subjects

None

Recommended background knowledge

A background in (non-spatial) databases is strongly recommended for this course, for example successful completion of SINF90001/INFO90002 Database Systems and Information Modelling, or similar subjects. Students who do not already have a strong background in databases are required before the start of the course to achieve an intermediate level of understanding and competence in relational database design, ER modelling, relational algebra, and SQL. Students wishing to acquire these required skills are recommended to engage in the following self-study activities before the beginning of the course:

  1. Read, understand, and be able to apply the principles and concepts covered in Chapter 2 of Worboys and Duckham (2004) GIS: A Computing Perspective 2nd edition, CRC Press
  2. Watch, understand, and be able to apply the principles and concepts contained in a series of short video lectures made available on the subject website
  3. Learn and practice programming basic SQL queries using online resources, such those recommended on the subject website.

Core participation requirements

The University of Melbourne is committed to providing students with reasonable adjustments to assessment and participation under the Disability Standards for Education (2005), and the Assessment and Results Policy (MPF1326). Students are expected to meet the core participation requirements for their course. These can be viewed under Entry and Participation Requirements for the course outlines in the Handbook.

Further details on how to seek academic adjustments can be found on the Student Equity and Disability Support website: http://services.unimelb.edu.au/student-equity/home

Assessment

Description

  • Three-hour exam (60%) held in the end of the semester examination period. Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs) 1, 2 and 3 are addressed in the examination
  • Four practical assignment reports (40%) each of about 3 pages length (500 words), each requiring approximately 13 – 15 hours of work, due evenly throughout the semester. ILOs 1 to 4 are addressed in the reports

Hurdle requirement: Students must achieve a mark of at least 50% in the written examination in order to pass this subject.

Dates & times

  • Semester 1
    Principal coordinatorMartin Tomko
    Mode of deliveryOn Campus — Parkville
    Contact hours48 hours (Lectures: 2 per week; Laboratory Exercises: 2 hours per week)
    Total time commitment200 hours
    Teaching period 4 March 2019 to 2 June 2019
    Last self-enrol date15 March 2019
    Census date31 March 2019
    Last date to withdraw without fail10 May 2019
    Assessment period ends28 June 2019

    Semester 1 contact information

Time commitment details

200 hours

Further information

  • Texts

    Prescribed texts

    • Worboys and Duckham, 2004. GIS: A computing perspective, second edition, CRC Press, ISBN: 0415283752.

    Recommended texts and other resources

    • Rigaux, Scholl and Voisard, 2002. Spatial databases: With application to GIS, Morgan Kaufmann, ISBN: 1558605886.
    • Shekhar and Chawla, 2002. Spatial databases: A tour, Prentice Hall, ISBN: 0130174807.
    • Silberschatz, Korth and Sudarshan, Database System Concepts, McGraw Hill.
  • Subject notes

    LEARNING AND TEACHING METHODS

    There will be lectures associated with weekly lab exercises to be done in a computing lab. Students are expected to interact with real systems and interact with each other in the labs.

    INDICATIVE KEY LEARNING RESOURCES

    • Worboys and Duckham, 2004. GIS: A computing perspective, second edition, CRC Press, ISBN: 0415283752.
    • Rigaux, Scholl and Voisard, 2002. Spatial databases: With application to GIS, Morgan Kaufmann, ISBN: 1558605886.
    • Shekhar and Chawla, 2002. Spatial databases: A tour, Prentice Hall, ISBN: 0130174807.
    • Silberschatz, Korth and Sudarshan, Database System Concepts, McGraw Hill.

    CAREERS / INDUSTRY LINKS

    Spatial Databases are fundamental to Spatial Information Science and Geographic Information Systems. Students will acquire knowledge in SQL and some of the dominant database systems on the market, which will be essential for any future career they may aim to pursue.

  • Available through the Community Access Program

    About the Community Access Program (CAP)

    This subject is available through the Community Access Program (also called Single Subject Studies) which allows you to enrol in single subjects offered by the University of Melbourne, without the commitment required to complete a whole degree.

    Entry requirements including prerequisites may apply. Please refer to the CAP applications page for further information.

    Additional information for this subject

    Subject coordinator approval required

  • Available to Study Abroad and/or Study Exchange Students

    This subject is available to students studying at the University from eligible overseas institutions on exchange and study abroad. Students are required to satisfy any listed requirements, such as pre- and co-requisites, for enrolment in the subject.

Last updated: 22 August 2019