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Reason and Revelation in Islam (ISLM90011)

Graduate courseworkPoints: 12.5Not available in 2019

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Overview

Year of offerNot available in 2019
Subject levelGraduate coursework
Subject codeISLM90011
FeesSubject EFTSL, Level, Discipline & Census Date

Students will be familiar with the rich heritage of Muslim Theology and philosophy. They will explore the development of Islamic theology and philosophy from the early period of Islamic history. At the beginning this subject will examine the rise of theological schools and their contributions to the development of Islamic thought. It covers all major schools of theology and faith. Case studies of specific schools and their methods will be conducted, paying attention to how and in what context they developed. And then it will also focus on the development of Islamic philosophy. Students will study and critically evaluate key features and contributions of prominent schools of Muslim philosophy and the selected writings of major philosophers such as al-Kindi, al-Farabi, Ibn Sina, al-Razi, Ibn Tufayl, Ibn Rushd, and al-Ghazali will be analysed. Selected modern Muslim philosophers will follow, with an added focus on their concerns about the influence of Western philosophers and intellectuals on Muslim thought in contemporary Muslim societies.

Intended learning outcomes

Students who successfully complete this subject should be able to:

  • explore traditions of Islamic theology and philosophy;
  • analyse and evaluate the contributions of major figures in Islamic theology and philosophy;
  • analyse and comment upon complex intellectual phenomena;
  • present analytical research as structured written arguments; and
  • recognize the plurality of global intellectual and cultural traditions and their commonalities.

Generic skills

Students who successfully complete this subject should be able to:

  • analyse and comment upon complex intellectual phenomena;
  • present analytical research as structured written arguments; and
  • recognize the plurality of global intellectual and cultural traditions and their commonalities.

Last updated: 23 May 2019