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  3. Rehabilitation Activity and Exercise

Rehabilitation Activity and Exercise (REHB90002)

Graduate courseworkPoints: 12.5Online

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Overview

Year of offer2019
Subject levelGraduate coursework
Subject codeREHB90002
Availability
Term 1 - Online
Term 4 - Online
FeesSubject EFTSL, Level, Discipline & Census Date

This subject will enable students to integrate and extend prior knowledge and skills to prescribe exercises that effectively and safely meet the needs of individuals, groups and specific populations across the lifespan and along the health and impairment continuum. Students will draw critically on evidence for the requirements for physical activity and exercise and the health risks due to sedentary behaviour and deliver and evaluate appropriate programs to manage these risks. Students will build on their clinical reasoning skills to theorise the mechanism of an individuals’ functional limitations and design and prescribe exercises to meet the goals of optimal health outcomes. Students will be expected to be critical in their analysis and evaluations of new and emerging forms of exercises, assessment tools and technologies that are not as yet supported by an evidence base.

All students will complete four modules within this subject.

All students will complete a Foundational module that will explore the pathophysiological and psychosocial theory of rehabilitation and evidence–based health outcomes of sedentary behaviour and exercise. A biopsychosocial framework will emphasise the biological, mechanical, social, psychological and cultural elements that influence exercise and physical activity. Further, students will build knowledge of the different types of exercise activity (cardio-vascular, fitness, strength, flexibility) and how these might be used to achieve different outcomes.

Students will then choose two from four modules that best meets their learning interests and/or practice needs. These modules are:

1. Habilitation The Fitness & Physical Activity module will cover the body systems and functions that contribute to fitness and the environmental and personal factors that influence individuals’ engagement with fitness and physical activity. The primary focus will be on measurement of fitness and physical function and exercise tolerance along the lifespan and the health and impairment continuum, including the role of new emerging innovations and technology tools that support current exercise and physical activity guidelines and priorities.

2. The Evidence for Exercise module will focus on the evidence base on the efficacy of exercise programs and physical activity in rehabilitation programs. Students will appraise both qualitative and quantitative evidence on outcomes of rehabilitation programs in select populations, including the role of new emerging innovations and technology tools that support current exercise and physical activity guidelines and priorities.

3. The Exercise for the Adult Population module will address the assessment and analyses of health related needs for adults in the selection of appropriate exercise interventions. Students will compare and contrast the personal and environmental circumstances that influence functional capabilities and participation preferences of adults within diverse practice contexts.

4. The Exercise for the Older Adult Population module will address the assessment and analyses of health related needs for older adults in the selection of appropriate exercise interventions. Students will compare and contrast the personal and environmental circumstances that influence functional capabilities and participation preferences of older adults within diverse practice contexts.

The final Integration module will be completed by all students and will focus on the design and evaluation of an exercise intervention to meet the needs of groups with common impairments or functional needs. Students will apply a model of rehabilitation best practice and using an ICF informed framework, in the execution of this task.

Intended learning outcomes

The curriculum is designed around three elements which provide both horizontal and vertical integration throughout the program. These elements are:

Rehabilitation Theory and Practice
1. Integrate prior knowledge, including pathophysiology and psychosocial theory of rehabilitation principles to inform appropriate exercise prescription for individuals, groups and specific populations across the life span and health and impairment continuum.
2. Critically integrate contemporary theory around the rehabilitation practice and health risks of sedentary behaviour across the lifespan and design, deliver and evaluate appropriate programs to manage these risks.
3. Critically assesses and analyse the health-related needs of individuals, groups and/or health populations for exercise interventions, recognising the personal and environmental circumstances that influence functional capability and participation preferences.
4. Design, implement and evaluate an exercise intervention to meet the needs of groups with common impairments or functional needs.

Evidence and Innovation
5. Select and critically justify appropriate outcome measures to evaluate the efficacy of physical activity and exercise interventions.
6. Critically evaluate and analyse the role of new emerging innovations and technology tools in terms of supporting current exercise and physical activity guidelines and priorities.

Clinical Practice in Context
7. Effectively communicate evidence informed therapeutic priorities to stakeholders whilst paying attention to client-shared goals within an ethical, person-centred and ICF informed framework.
8. Create and apply a model of rehabilitation best practice that aligns with the individual or group needs, whilst recognising the contextual environment and personal complexities associated with exercise and physical activity

Generic skills

On completion of this subject, students will have had the opportunity to develop the skills associated with:

  • Effective oral and written communication
  • Critical and creative thinking with strong reasoning skills
  • Engaging with contemporary local, national and global issues
  • Working collaboratively with people from diverse linguistic and cultural backgrounds
  • Motivation, self-direction and being well-organised
  • Set goals and managing time and priorities
  • Self-awareness and reflective practice, with skills in self-assessment

Last updated: 12 June 2019