1. Handbook
  2. Subjects
  3. Rehabilitation in Neurology
  4. Print

Rehabilitation in Neurology (REHB90008)

Graduate courseworkPoints: 12.5Online

You’re viewing the 2019 Handbook:
Or view archived Handbooks

Overview

Year of offer2019
Subject levelGraduate coursework
Subject codeREHB90008
Availability
Term 3 - Online
FeesSubject EFTSL, Level, Discipline & Census Date

This wholly online subject introduces students to the rapidly evolving field of neurorehabilitation. The theories and the evidence supporting the theories will be reviewed to identify why selected neurorehabilitation approaches are effective for people with neurological conditions. This subject will provide students with an opportunity to critically review their own neurorehabilitation practice in the areas of assessment, analysis and treatment planning. Students will be required to synthesise and interpret the evidence to demonstrate how it could be applied in their own setting to improve their current practice
This subject is divided into modules to allow flexibility for students to choose areas of neurorehabilitation that best match their interests or work context. Similarly, there is flexibility in the assessment tasks to allow students to focus upon areas of neurorehabilitation that are of interest and relevant to their working context.

All students will complete a foundational theory module that reviews the relevant neuroanatomy, neurophysiology and neuropathology that is the basis for understanding theories related to recovery following a neurological injury. Students will then choose two from four modules that best meets their learning interests and/or practice needs.

These modules are:
1. Body Structures and Systems: This module will examine theories and evidence related to neuropathology and recovery at the level of body structure and function. Innovative approaches to the analysis of brain function and changes to brain activity with intervention will be examined and the evidence that is emerging in this area will be evaluated to identify how the knowledge could be applied in the clinical context.
2. Activities and Participation: This module will examine emerging evidence related to the assessment of activities and participation including evaluation with wearable technologies and analysis of movement quality through kinematic analysis. The effectiveness of new therapeutic approaches to improving activity and participation will be examined including the use of virtual reality and robotics.
3. Personal context: This module will examine principles related to the person that are important in neurorehabilitation and will include application of advanced skills related to goal setting, patient interviewing, effective listening and behavior change.
4. Environment: This module will examine the role of the environment in neurorehabilitation including emerging evidence from animal and human studies that show how environmental enrichment affects recovery at the level of body structure and activity. The module will also examine how innovative technologies such as telerehabilitation could be applied to in the neurorehabilitation context.

The final module is an integration and application of the concepts explored during the foundational and selective streams. Students will have an opportunity to further explore the themes that have emerged through student and expert presentations.

Intended learning outcomes

The curriculum is designed around three elements, which provide both horizontal and vertical integration throughout the course.

Rehabilitation Theory and Practice
1. Identify and critically evaluate evidence from recent neuroanatomical and neurophysiological studies to explain how the evidence informs theories for effective therapy approaches in neurorehabilitation.
2. Synthesise evidence to design neurorehabilitation assessments that are evidenced based and patient centric.
3. Use theories and evidence in neurorehabilitation to demonstrate advanced analysis of physical, cognitive and behavioural problems in people with neurological conditions.
4. Demonstrate an advanced understanding of contemporary theories and evidence in neurorehabilitation to develop treatment plans that are appropriate for individuals within their personal and environmental context.

Evidence and Innovation
5. Discuss how innovations in neurorehabilitation at the level of body structure, activity and participation may be applied in the neurorehabilitation context.
6. Identify how innovations in the areas relevant to the personal and environmental context for people with neurological conditions such as bioengineering and telerehabilitation may be applied in the neurorehabilitation context.

Clinical Practice in Context
7. Critically appraise clinical practice in their own rehabilitation context and discuss how contemporary theories and evidence could be adopted to improve practice.
8. Design an evidenced-based service improvement that could be implemented in their own neurorehabilitation context.

Generic skills

On completion of this subject students will have had the opportunity to develop the skills associated with:

  • applying knowledge and reasoning skills to complex problems in a range of contexts
  • effective oral and written communication skills
  • inquiry and creative solutions to challenges in their practice context
  • awareness of and appropriate responsiveness to the social and cultural diversity in their practice and ensuring cultural safety for rehabilitation consumers and workers from diverse linguistic and cultural backgrounds
  • self-assurance and confidence in their knowledge, yet flexible and adaptable, and aware of their limitations

Eligibility and requirements

Prerequisites

None

Corequisites

None

Non-allowed subjects

None

Recommended background knowledge

Graduate level knowledge of the health care system and professional role consistent with a bachelor program in a health care science.

Core participation requirements

The University of Melbourne is committed to providing students with reasonable adjustments to assessment and participation under the Disability Standards for Education (2005), and the Assessment and Results Policy (MPF1326). Students are expected to meet the core participation requirements for their course. These can be viewed under Entry and Participation Requirements for the course outlines in the Handbook.

Further details on how to seek academic adjustments can be found on the Student Equity and Disability Support website: http://services.unimelb.edu.au/student-equity/home

Assessment

Description

  • Weekly contribution to online discussions (total equivalent to 1,000 words) throughout the semester (10%)
  • Outline of practice example – 500 words, due week 2 (10%)
  • Critical analysis of practice – 2000 words, due week 9 (40%)
  • 10 minute presentation, due week 5 (20%)
  • 1000 word practice portfolio, due week 8 (20%)

Dates & times

  • Term 3 - Online
    CoordinatorLibby Proud
    Mode of deliveryOnline
    Contact hoursApproximately 32 hours (8 weeks x 4 hrs). This is a fully online subject that is delivered over 8 weeks with a combination of guided and independent learning. There will be a mix of didactic instruction (videos and texts) and facilitated synchronous (3 x 1 hr webinars) and asynchronous activity (weekly discussion board tasks), which will equate to approximately 4 hours per week.
    Pre teaching start date15 July 2019
    Pre teaching requirementsThere is a one week pre-teaching period during which students can choose to: 1) View a video presentation of an overview of the subject, assessment requirements and student expectations 2) Engage with discussion board to meet their tutors and colleagues enrolled in the program 3) Become familiar with the library by completing a small task that requires navigation of library resources, and 4) Complete one online task which will familiarise them with online learning requirements. This task can involve a quick quiz, reading a newspaper piece on a contemporary debate or reading a seminar paper on the subject. These activities serve to familiarise the students with the online learning environment and prepare the students for commencing in their learning fully informed about the requirements of the subject.
    Teaching period22 July 2019 to 15 September 2019
    Last self-enrol date16 July 2019
    Census date 9 August 2019
    Last date to withdraw without fail30 August 2019
    Assessment period ends22 September 2019

    Term 3 contact information

    Melbourne School of Professional and Continuing Education Email: continuing-education@unimelb.edu.au Phone: + 61 3 8344 0149 Monday to Friday 8am to 9pm AEST/AEDT. Weekends and University of Melbourne observed Public Holidays 10am to 5pm AEST/AEDT.

Time commitment details

Approximately 140 hours, (9 weeks x 12 hrs + 32 contact hrs). The final assessment task will be submitted at the end of week 9. Students will be expected to complete independent learning activity equivalent to approximately 12 hours a week over the 9 weeks.

Additional delivery details

There is a one week pre-teaching period during which students can choose to:
1) View a video presentation of an overview of the subject, assessment requirements and student expectations
2) Engage with discussion board to meet their tutors and colleagues enrolled in the program
3) Become familiar with the library by completing a small task that requires navigation of library resources, and
4) Complete one online task which will familiarise them with online learning requirements. This task can involve a quick quiz, reading a newspaper piece on a contemporary debate or reading a seminar paper on the subject.

These activities serve to familiarise the students with the online learning environment and prepare the students for commencing in their learning fully informed about the requirements of the subject.

Further information

Last updated: 12 March 2019