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  3. Imaging the Environment

Imaging the Environment (GEOM30009)

Undergraduate level 3Points: 12.5On Campus (Parkville)

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Overview

Year of offer2017
Subject levelUndergraduate Level 3
Subject codeGEOM30009
Campus
Parkville
Availability
Semester 1
FeesSubject EFTSL, Level, Discipline & Census Date

AIMS

This subject will introduce students to the use of imagery in the mapping of both human and natural environments. Imagery is often the cheapest way to gain spatial information about the environment, especially for large areas, but analysis and interpretation of the data requires sophisticated techniques. Usually the light or other electromagnetic radiation being emitted or reflected from the surface being imaged needs to be interpreted into another variable of interest, such as the type of vegetation on the surface. Once interpreted, the information must be communicated to others; usually in the form of maps or reports.

This subject builds on a student’s knowledge of the physical and built environment relevant to their discipline and allows them to interpret and communicate that knowledge. On completion of the subject students should have the skills to perform routine image analysis tasks in the workplace using industry standard software. This subject partners with others to the Spatial Systems majors of the undergraduate science and environments degrees to allow the student to progress to the Master of Engineering (Spatial) or to enter the workforce in a paraprofessional role.

INDICATIVE CONTENT

  • Image interpretation basics
  • Image acquisition and formation
  • Fundamentals of image processing and measurement
  • Both aerial photography and satellite imagery will be used to illustrate the techniques of measurement and interpretation by which both spatial position and semantic content can be extracted from image data.

Intended learning outcomes

INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES (ILO)

On completion of this subject the student is expected to:

  1. Describe those characteristics of different imaging techniques which allow information to be extracted from the image
  2. Extract information from images
  3. Design and create representations of spatial information extracted from image data
  4. Analyse image data to monitor both human and natural environments
  5. Interpret image data to inform management of human and natural environments.

Generic skills

On completion of this subject students should have:

  • The ability to apply knowledge of basic science fundamentals
  • The ability to communicate effectively, not only with other scientists but also with the community at large
  • The ability to undertake problem identification, formulation and solution
  • The ability to function effectively as an individual and in multi-disciplinary and multi-cultural teams, with the capacity to be a leader or manager as well as an effective team member
  • An expectation of the need to undertake lifelong learning, capacity to do so
  • The capacity for independent critical thought, rational inquiry and self-directed learning
  • Openness to new ideas and unconventional critiques of received wisdom.

Last updated: 20 June 2017