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Analysing Professional Communication (MECM20012)

Undergraduate level 2Points: 12.5On Campus (Parkville)

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Overview

Year of offer2017
Subject levelUndergraduate Level 2
Subject codeMECM20012
Campus
Parkville
Availability
Semester 1
Semester 2
FeesSubject EFTSL, Level, Discipline & Census Date

Effective communication is the key to successful practice in many disciplines. This subject details how talk is managed in a range of professional settings, including: education (e.g. teacher-student interactions); medicine (e.g. doctor-patient consultations), psychology (e.g. counselling), law (e.g. question design in courtrooms), and journalism (e.g. radio interviews).

This subject will introduce students to interactional practices that are common to all workplaces: negotiation and resolving conflict; sources of misunderstanding; aligning with other speakers; managing topics; and different cultural practices in making sense of talk at work. Students will learn how interaction is organized based on the fundamental tenets of conversation analysis: turn-taking, repair and the sequential organization of talk. Students will develop an understanding of how these rules are managed in a range of settings, understanding talk as collaboratively achieved and fundamental to professional development.

On completion of this subject, students will be able to evaluate practices of effective communication in a range of professional settings, develop their own communication skills, and identify practical solutions to communication problems in the workplace.

Learning outcomes

On completion of this students should be able to:

  • Identify verbal and non-verbal features of talk, using conversation analysis transcription;
  • Identify and explain the structural ‘rules' of talk;
  • Demonstrate key understandings of how communication is (mis)managed in professional settings;
  • Analyse specific communication practices used in different professional contexts;
  • Demonstrate how research evidence can provide solutions to communication issues in the workplace.

Generic skills

  • Research skills through effective use of library resources and electronic databases;
  • Critical thinking and analysis through reviews of the research literature and workshop discussions;
  • Creative thinking through conceptualising theoretical problems, forming judgements and arguments from conflicting evidence and by critical analysis;
  • Communicating knowledge effectively through workshop discussions and assessment tasks;
  • Written communication skills through assignment preparation;
  • Public speaking skills through workshop discussions;
  • Attention to detail through assignment preparation and writing;
  • Time management and planning through managing and organising workloads for class participation, recommended reading, and assignment completion.

Last updated: 25 April 2017