Handbook

MECM20012 Analysing Professional Communication

Credit Points: 12.5
Level: 2 (Undergraduate)
Dates & Locations:

This subject has the following teaching availabilities in 2017:

Semester 1, Parkville - Taught on campus.Show/hide details
Pre-teaching Period Start not applicable
Teaching Period 27-Feb-2017 to 28-May-2017
Assessment Period End 23-Jun-2017
Last date to Self-Enrol 10-Mar-2017
Census Date 31-Mar-2017
Last date to Withdraw without fail 05-May-2017

Semester 2, Parkville - Taught on campus.Show/hide details
Pre-teaching Period Start not applicable
Teaching Period 24-Jul-2017 to 22-Oct-2017
Assessment Period End 17-Nov-2017
Last date to Self-Enrol 04-Aug-2017
Census Date 31-Aug-2017
Last date to Withdraw without fail 22-Sep-2017


Timetable can be viewed here.
For information about these dates, click here.
Time Commitment: Contact Hours: 36 hours
Total Time Commitment:

170 hours

Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
Recommended Background Knowledge: None
Non Allowed Subjects: None
Core Participation Requirements:

For the purposes of considering request for Reasonable Adjustments under the Disability Standards for Education (Cwth 2005), and Students Experiencing Academic Disadvantage Policy, academic requirements for this subject are articulated in the Subject Overview, Learning Outcomes and Assessment Requirements of this entry.

The University is dedicated to provide support to those with special requirements. Further details on the disability support scheme can be found at the Disability Liaison website: http://www.services.unimelb.edu.au/disability

Coordinator

Dr Amelia Church

Contact

achurch@unimelb.edu.au

Subject Overview:

Effective communication is the key to successful practice in many disciplines. This subject details how talk is managed in a range of professional settings, including: education (e.g. teacher-student interactions); medicine (e.g. doctor-patient consultations), psychology (e.g. counselling), law (e.g. question design in courtrooms), and journalism (e.g. radio interviews).

This subject will introduce students to interactional practices that are common to all workplaces: negotiation and resolving conflict; sources of misunderstanding; aligning with other speakers; managing topics; and different cultural practices in making sense of talk at work. Students will learn how interaction is organized based on the fundamental tenets of conversation analysis: turn-taking, repair and the sequential organization of talk. Students will develop an understanding of how these rules are managed in a range of settings, understanding talk as collaboratively achieved and fundamental to professional development.

On completion of this subject, students will be able to evaluate practices of effective communication in a range of professional settings, develop their own communication skills, and identify practical solutions to communication problems in the workplace.

Learning Outcomes:

On completion of this students should be able to:

  • Identify verbal and non-verbal features of talk, using conversation analysis transcription;
  • Identify and explain the structural ‘rules' of talk;
  • Demonstrate key understandings of how communication is (mis)managed in professional settings;
  • Analyse specific communication practices used in different professional contexts;
  • Demonstrate how research evidence can provide solutions to communication issues in the workplace.
Assessment:
  • Short written reviews (8 x 250 words) due throughout the semester (50%)
  • Professional development assignment (2000) due in the examination period (50%)

Hurdle requirements:

  • Transcription taskdue mid semester
  • Minimum of 80% attendance at all scheduled lectures, tutorials, seminars and workshops.
Prescribed Texts:

Sidnell, J. & Stivers, T. (2012) The Handbook of Conversation Analysis. Chicester: Wiley. (E-book)

All weekly subject readings available on LMS.

Breadth Options:

This subject potentially can be taken as a breadth subject component for the following courses:

You should visit learn more about breadth subjects and read the breadth requirements for your degree, and should discuss your choice with your student adviser, before deciding on your subjects.

Fees Information: Subject EFTSL, Level, Discipline & Census Date
Generic Skills:
  • Research skills through effective use of library resources and electronic databases;
  • Critical thinking and analysis through reviews of the research literature and workshop discussions;
  • Creative thinking through conceptualising theoretical problems, forming judgements and arguments from conflicting evidence and by critical analysis;
  • Communicating knowledge effectively through workshop discussions and assessment tasks;
  • Written communication skills through assignment preparation;
  • Public speaking skills through workshop discussions;
  • Attention to detail through assignment preparation and writing;
  • Time management and planning through managing and organising workloads for class participation, recommended reading, and assignment completion.
Links to further information: http://education.unimelb.edu.au/study_with_us/breadth
Related Breadth Track(s): Deafness and Communication

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