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Reactor Engineering (CHEN30001)

Undergraduate level 3Points: 12.5On Campus (Parkville)

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Overview

Year of offer2019
Subject levelUndergraduate Level 3
Subject codeCHEN30001
Campus
Parkville
Availability
Semester 1
FeesSubject EFTSL, Level, Discipline & Census Date

AIMS

This subject introduces students to aspects of reactor system design. Chemical reactors are at the heart of any major chemical process design. Chemical reaction engineering is concerned with the exploitation of chemical reactions on a commercial scale. Chemical reaction engineering aims at studying and optimizing chemical reactions in order to define the best reactor design. Hence, the interactions of flow phenomena, mass transfer, heat transfer, and reaction kinetics are of prime importance in order to relate reactor performance to feed composition and operating conditions.

This subject is one of the key parts of the chemical and biochemical engineering curriculum upon which a lot of later year material is built.

INDICATIVE CONTENT

  1. Kinetics of homogeneous reactions
  2. Design of single ideal reactors
  3. Multiple reactor systems
  4. Other design reactors (recycle reactors and temperature effects)
  5. Basics of non-ideal flow
  6. Models for reactors
  7. Mixed flow in model reactors.

Intended learning outcomes

INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES (ILOs)

On completion of this subject the student is expected to:

  1. Interpret data from both ideal and non-ideal batch, plug flow and mixed flow reactors
  2. Model more complex flowing reactor systems using combinations of idealized plug flow and continuously stirred tank ranks
  3. Design simple reactor systems
  4. Predict simple temperature profiles in reacting systems.

Generic skills

On completion of this subject students should have developed team work skills and enhance the following generic skills:

  • Ability to undertake problem identification, formulation and solution
  • Capacity for independent thought
  • Ability and self-confidence to comprehend complex concepts, to express them lucidly and to confront unfamiliar problem.

Eligibility and requirements

Prerequisites

Undergraduate students:

Students must have completed:

ONE OF:

Code Name Teaching period Credit Points
CHEN20010 Material and Energy Balances
Semester 1
Semester 2
12.5

CHEN20008 - Chemical Process Analysis 2

AND:

Code Name Teaching period Credit Points
CHEM20018 Chemistry: Reactions and Synthesis
Semester 1
12.5

(CHEM20018 Reactions and Synthesis may also be taken concurrently)

Postgraduate students:

Admission to the MC-ENG 300-point Master of Engineering (Chemical), (Chemical with Business), (Biochemical) or (Materials)

AND ONE OF:

Code Name Teaching period Credit Points
CHEN20010 Material and Energy Balances
Semester 1
Semester 2
12.5

CHEN20008 - Chemical Process Analysis 2

OR Admission into the MC-ENG 200-point Master of Engineering (Chemical), (Biochemical) or (Materials)

Corequisites

None

Non-allowed subjects

CHEN40003 Reactor Engineering

Core participation requirements

The University of Melbourne is committed to providing students with reasonable adjustments to assessment and participation under the Disability Standards for Education (2005), and the Assessment and Results Policy (MPF1326). Students are expected to meet the core participation requirements for their course. These can be viewed under Entry and Participation Requirements for the course outlines in the Handbook.

This subject requires all students to actively and safely participate in laboratory activities. Students who feel their disability may impact upon their participation are encouraged to discuss this matter with the Subject Coordinator and Student Equity and Disability Support.

Further details on how to seek academic adjustments can be found on the Student Equity and Disability Support website: http://services.unimelb.edu.au/student-equity/home

Assessment

Description

  • A two-hour written test (15%), held mid-semester (on or around week 6). Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs) 1 to 4 are addressed in this test
  • Two lab reports (15%); no more than 10 pages per report (not including title page, nomenclature, and appendices). An overall time commitment of 15-20 hours. ILOs 1 to 4 are addressed in the laboratory assignments. One in the first-half of semester and the second in the second-half of semester
  • Three-hour end of semester examination (70%). The examination paper will consist of problems designed to test whether the student has acquired the ability to apply fundamental principles to the solutions of problems involving chemical reactors. The problems set for the exam will be similar to those undertaken in the tutorial class. ILOs 1 to 4 are addressed in the examination.

Hurdle requirement: A mark of 40% or more in the end-of-semester examination is required to pass the subject.

Dates & times

  • Semester 1
    Principal coordinatorGreg Qiao
    Mode of deliveryOn Campus — Parkville
    Contact hours2 x 1 hour lecture and 1 x 2 hour lecture per week, 1 x 1 hour tutorial per week and 2 x 3 hour laboratory sessions per semester
    Total time commitment170 hours
    Teaching period 4 March 2019 to 2 June 2019
    Last self-enrol date15 March 2019
    Census date31 March 2019
    Last date to withdraw without fail10 May 2019
    Assessment period ends28 June 2019

    Semester 1 contact information

    Prof Greg Qiao

    Email: gregghq@unimelb.edu.au

Time commitment details

Estimated 170 hours

Further information

  • Texts

    Prescribed texts

    O. Levenspiel, Chemical Reaction Engineering, 3rd Edition, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York,1999

    Recommended texts and other resources

    Missen, R. W., Mims, C. A., and Saville, B. A., 1999, Introduction to chemical reaction engineering and kinetics, John Wiley & Sons, Inc, New York,
    Fogler, H.S., 1999, Elements of chemical reaction engineering, 3rd Edition, Prentice Hall PTR, New Jersey,

  • Subject notes

    LEARNING AND TEACHING METHODS

    The subject will be delivered through a combination of lectures and tutorials. Students will also complete two experiments which will reinforce the material covered in lectures. The two experiments are:

    1. Chemical Reactors
    2. Dynamics of Reactors

    INDICATIVE KEY LEARNING RESOURCES

    Missen, R. W., Mims, C. A., and Saville, B. A., 1999, Introduction to chemical reaction engineering and kinetics, John Wiley & Sons, Inc, New York,
    Fogler, H.S., 1999, Elements of chemical reaction engineering, 3rd Edition, Prentice Hall PTR, New Jersey,

    CAREERS / INDUSTRY LINKS

    The skills gained in this subject are crucial to the career of a process engineer. They will be important for students wishing to progress to jobs in engineering design offices or in operational roles within a wide range of chemical industries including petrochemicals, polymer and surfactant manufacture.

  • Breadth options
  • Available through the Community Access Program

    About the Community Access Program (CAP)

    This subject is available through the Community Access Program (also called Single Subject Studies) which allows you to enrol in single subjects offered by the University of Melbourne, without the commitment required to complete a whole degree.

    Entry requirements including prerequisites may apply. Please refer to the CAP applications page for further information.

    Additional information for this subject

    Subject coordinator approval required

  • Available to Study Abroad and/or Study Exchange Students

    This subject is available to students studying at the University from eligible overseas institutions on exchange and study abroad. Students are required to satisfy any listed requirements, such as pre- and co-requisites, for enrolment in the subject.

Last updated: 10 April 2019