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  3. Patterns and Processes of Landscape Fire

Patterns and Processes of Landscape Fire (FRST90025)

Graduate courseworkPoints: 12.5On Campus (Parkville)

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Overview

Year of offer2019
Subject levelGraduate coursework
Subject codeFRST90025
Campus
Parkville
Availability
February
FeesSubject EFTSL, Level, Discipline & Census Date

The course covers the fundamentals of fire behaviour and the key drivers. Students will examine the importance of the key factors affecting fire behaviour including fuels, weather, topography and ignitions. Methodologies for measuring fuels, fuel moisture, and weather will be examined through theoretical and practical approaches. Using these skills, students will learn computer and manual approaches for predicting the extent and intensity of landscape fires in a range of ecosystems. Students will apply the knowledge of fire patterns to examine how prescribed burning might be used for land management and the fundamentals of wildfire suppression strategies and tactics. Finally, we will assess the potential changes to fire patterns under global climate change.

Intended learning outcomes

By the end of the subject students should have:

 

  • An understanding the importance of fuel composition and structure on fire behaviour. In particular, an understanding of the importance of fuel moisture, composition, accumulation, decomposition and spatial distribution.
  • An understand the fundamentals of fire behaviour ‐ pyrolysis, combustion, and heat transfer
  • Experience in the use of fire behaviour prediction using manual methods and models linked to Geographic Information Systems.
  • Experience in the use of fire behaviour prediction using manual methods and models linked to Geographic Information Systems.
  • Knowledge of the effects of climate and weather patterns on fire occurrence and behaviour.
  • Experience using weather observations and forecasts to predict fire behaviour.
  • Critical analysis of the potential changes to fire regimes under future climate scenarios.

Generic skills

Highly developed written communication skills to allow informed dialogue with individuals and groups from industry, government and the community

Last updated: 11 November 2018