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Language and Power in Asian Societies (ASIA10001)

Undergraduate level 1Points: 12.5On Campus (Parkville)

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Overview

Year of offer2019
Subject levelUndergraduate Level 1
Subject codeASIA10001
Campus
Parkville
Availability
Semester 1
FeesSubject EFTSL, Level, Discipline & Census Date

This subject examines the intimate relationship between language and society in the historical and contemporary contexts of three internationally strategic regions: East Asia, insular Southeast Asia, and the Arabic world. It will explore recurring themes such as the relationship of language to power, hegemony and political struggle. the effect of nationalism on language. language as a means for creating social organisation and hierarchy. the relationship between minority and majority languages and cultures. and the role of the media, popular culture and literacy in contemporary linguistic and social relations.

Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this subject, students should:

  • gain an understanding of the political and cultural significance of language in societies in Asia and the Middle East;
  • master basic level essay writing;
  • develop skills to critically read scholarly literature and synthesise this with information form lectures.

Generic skills

  • acquire written communication skills through essay writing and seminar discussion.
  • show attention to detail through essay preparation and writing.
  • acquire time management and planning skills through managing and organising workloads for recommended reading, essay and assignment completion.
  • acquire public speaking skills through tutorial and seminar discussion and class presentations.
  • learn critical thinking and analysis through recommended reading, essay writing and tutorial discussion, and by determining strength of an argument.
  • be able to research through competent use of the library, and other information sources and the definition of areas of inquiry and methods of research.
  • be able to think in theoretical terms through lectures, tutorial discussions, essay writing and engagement in the methodologies of the humanities and social sciences.

Eligibility and requirements

Prerequisites

None

Corequisites

None

Non-allowed subjects

None

Core participation requirements

The University of Melbourne is committed to providing students with reasonable adjustments to assessment and participation under the Disability Standards for Education (2005), and the Assessment and Results Policy (MPF1326). Students are expected to meet the core participation requirements for their course. These can be viewed under Entry and Participation Requirements for the course outlines in the Handbook.

Further details on how to seek academic adjustments can be found on the Student Equity and Disability Support website: http://services.unimelb.edu.au/student-equity/home

Assessment

Description

  • Two essays of 2000 words each, 50% each (one due mid-semester, one due during the examination period)
  • Hurdle requirement: Class attendance is required for this subject; if you do not attend a minimum of 80% of classes without an approved exemption you will not be eligible for a pass in this subject.
  • Note: Assessment submitted late without an approved extension will be penalised at 10% per day. In-class tasks missed without approval will not be marked. All pieces of written work must be submitted to pass this subject.

Dates & times

  • Semester 1
    Principal coordinatorIkuko Nakane
    Mode of deliveryOn Campus — Parkville
    Contact hoursA total of 36 hours: A 2-hour lecture and 1-hour tutorial per week
    Total time commitment170 hours
    Teaching period 4 March 2019 to 2 June 2019
    Last self-enrol date15 March 2019
    Census date31 March 2019
    Last date to withdraw without fail10 May 2019
    Assessment period ends28 June 2019

    Semester 1 contact information

Time commitment details

Time commitment totals 170 hours.

Further information

  • Texts

    Prescribed texts

    Materials supplied by the Institute.

  • Breadth options
  • Available through the Community Access Program

    About the Community Access Program (CAP)

    This subject is available through the Community Access Program (also called Single Subject Studies) which allows you to enrol in single subjects offered by the University of Melbourne, without the commitment required to complete a whole degree.

    Entry requirements including prerequisites may apply. Please refer to the CAP applications page for further information.

  • Available to Study Abroad and/or Study Exchange Students

    This subject is available to students studying at the University from eligible overseas institutions on exchange and study abroad. Students are required to satisfy any listed requirements, such as pre- and co-requisites, for enrolment in the subject.

Last updated: 21 March 2019