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  3. Mind, Brain and Behaviour 2

Mind, Brain and Behaviour 2 (PSYC10004)

Undergraduate level 1Points: 12.5Campus: Parkville

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Overview

Year of offer2017
Subject levelUndergraduate Level 1
Subject codePSYC10004
Mode of delivery
On Campus — Parkville
Availability
Semester 2
FeesSubject EFTSL, Level, Discipline & Census Date

Mind, Brain and Behaviour 2 focuses on the development of the individual and their interaction with their environment and considers what the consequences are, both when this interaction proceeds smoothly and when it does not proceed smoothly. Questions concerning human development giving attention to cognitive and to social-emotional aspects are explored. An understanding of some basic issues in human development is complemented with an examination of the nature and development of personality and human interaction in social groups and cultural settings.

The course is designed to raise significant questions prompting students to think about behaviour and to explore possible answers. Students will be introduced to the tools used in psychology to find answers to these questions. A common research-centred framework is adopted and the statistical tools that support this framework are introduced and developed as an integral part of the course. Psychology derives its approaches and questions from both science and the arts.

Learning outcomes

  • To introduce the broad areas and varied approaches that comprise the field of psychology;
  • To develop an understanding of some key psychological concepts and theories from several areas of psychology;
  • To develop skills in the use and evaluation of scientific methodology and enquiry, including research design and data analysis;
  • To develop basic skills in the critical evaluation of psychological literature;
  • To develop skills in report writing as it applies to the study of psychology.

Generic skills

On completion of Mind, Brain and Behaviour 2 students should be able to:

  • apply analytical skills to new issues;
  • apply a hypothesis testing approach to new questions, including formulation of a research question, collection of relevant observations, analysis and interpretation of data using basic descriptive statistics to arrive at a conclusion; communicate the findings of empirical studies.

Last updated: 27 March 2017