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Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (MC-DVETMED)

Masters (Extended)Year: 2019 Delivered: On Campus (Parkville)

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Overview

Award titleDoctor of Veterinary Medicine
Year & campus2019 — Parkville
CRICOS code071999D
Fees informationSubject EFTSL, level, discipline and census date
Study level & typeGraduate Coursework
AQF level 9
Credit points400 credit points
Duration48 months full time

The program of study will be four years full time, and will be delivered at the Parkville campus (Years One and Two) and at the Werribee campus (Years Three and Four).

The Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) curriculum will assume prior knowledge and experience of scientific thought processes. This will allow for the early introduction of an integrated, interdisciplinary approach to veterinary studies, an approach that provides opportunities for students to apply their understanding to authentic cases, to practise evidence-based decision-making, to solve clinical problems and to acquire clinical competencies in an ordered and sequential way, from the first year of their course. By the time they reach the final year of the DVM, students will be immersed in a community of best practice in the University’s Hospital, where the explicit teaching of the lecture theatre, practical class and tutorial room gives way to peer to peer teaching and experiential learning.

Students successfully completing the Veterinary Bioscience specialisation of the Animal Health and Disease major of the BSc will have guaranteed progression to the DVM, with credit for all subjects in DVM1.

Doctor of Veterinary Medicine with Distinction

The Doctor of Veterinary Medicine with Distinction will be awarded to completing students (graduates) who have achieved a weighted average mark of 80% or more across all subjects in the final three years of the DVM course.

Entry requirements

Normal Entry (i.e. ‘graduate selection’)

1. In order to be considered for entry, applicants must have completed:

  • the Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Biomedicine or Bachelor of Agriculture degree at the University of Melbourne, or an equivalent degree from another institution, including specified prerequisite subjects (at least one semester of study in biology and at least one semester of study in biochemistry); and
  • a personal statement demonstrating interest and commitment to animal health, production and welfare and in pursuing a career in the veterinary science profession and any experience working with animals and/or other fields relevant to veterinary science.

Meeting these requirements does not guarantee selection.

2. In ranking applications, the Selection Committee will consider:

  • prior academic performance (based on grade-point average protocols approved specifically for the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine); and
  • the personal statement.

3. The Selection Committee may seek further information to clarify any aspect of an application in accordance with the Academic Board Rules on the use of selection instruments.

4. Applicants are required to satisfy the university’s English language requirements for postgraduate courses. For those applicants seeking to meet these requirements by one of the standard tests approved by the Academic Board, performance band 7 is required.

Entry with advanced standing via the Veterinary Bioscience specialisation of the Animal Health and Disease major of the Bachelor of Science at the University of Melbourne (i.e. ‘undergraduate selection’)

The alternative pathway for entry to the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine is available to current undergraduate students who have completed two years of the Bachelor of Science at the University of Melbourne, including the specified prerequisite subjects.

Applicants apply for the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine at the end of their second year and, if successful, are enrolled into subjects in Veterinary Bioscience specialisation of the Animal Health and Disease major of the Bachelor of Science. Students selected via this pathway who then successfully complete the Bachelor of Science, including all subjects in the Animal Health and Disease major (Veterinary Bioscience specialisation) will be assured entry in to the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine program, with credit for all subjects at the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine first year level (100 points). The selection point into the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine is therefore prior to the third year of the Bachelor of Science.

1. In order to be considered for entry, applicants must have completed:

  • the first and second years of the Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Biomedicine degree at the University of Melbourne, including specified prerequisite subjects; and
  • a personal statement demonstrating interest and commitment to animal health, production and welfare and in pursuing a career in the veterinary science profession and any experience working with animals and/or other field in fields relevant to veterinary science.

Meeting these requirements does not guarantee selection.

2. In ranking applications, the Selection Committee will consider:

  • prior academic performance in science subjects, with greater weight placed on second or third-year subjects than on first-year subjects; and
  • the personal statement.

3. The Selection Committee may seek further information to clarify any aspect of an application in accordance with the Academic Board Rules on the use of selection instruments.

4. Applicants are required to satisfy the university’s English language requirements for graduate courses. For those applicants seeking to meet these requirements by one of the standard tests approved by the Academic Board, performance band 7 is required.

Note.

  • Successful applications must consent to be vaccinated against Q fever, or provide evidence of previous vaccination/inoculation against Q fever upon request.
  • Graduate Degree Packages for School Leavers

The University of Melbourne offers Graduate Degree Packages to high achieving school leavers, allowing them to secure places (Commonwealth Supported Places for domestic students or International fee places) in the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine provided that they meet certain requirements.

For a Commonwealth Supported Place or an International Fee Place, the applicant must:

  • complete an Australian Year 12 or the International Baccalaureate (IB) in 2018 or later either:

in Australia; or

outside Australia and be an Australian citizen;

  • achieve an ATAR (or notional ATAR) of at least 98.50;
  • apply for a University of Melbourne Graduate Degree Packages for commencement in the year following completion of Year 12 or IB via VTAC;
  • enrol immediately or be granted deferral in the year following Year 12;
  • complete the first and second years of the Bachelor of Science degree at the University of Melbourne, including specified prerequisite subjects;
  • achieve a minimum weighted average mark of H2B (70%) across all level 1 subjects and a H2B (70%) average across all level 2 subjects;
  • at the time of enrolment in the veterinary bioscience specialization, submit a personal statement demonstrating interest and commitment to animal health, production and welfare and in pursuing a career in the veterinary science profession; and
  • commence the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine within 18 months of completing the undergraduate degree.

Applicants should refer to the University handbook for the additional entry requirements for the Bachelor of Science.

Core participation requirements

For the purposes of considering requests for Reasonable Adjustments under the Disability Standards for Education (Cwth 2005), and Students Experiencing Academic Disadvantage Policy, academic requirements for this subjects in the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine course are articulated in the Overview, Intended Learning Outcomes, Generic Skills and Assessment entries for each subject.

The University is dedicated to provide support to those with special requirements. Further details on the disability support scheme can be found at the Disability Liaison website:
http://www.services.unimelb.edu.au/disability/

It is a requirement of the course that students fully participate in teaching activities involving the use of animals. There are no exceptions to this.

The University has a policy regarding the conscientious objection to animal use. However, within the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine, activities involving the use of animals for teaching purposes are essential to the development of relevant skills and attributes and the requirement for all students to fully and actively participate cannot be waived.

Additional requirements of the course are that students agree to be vaccinated against Q fever and tetanus and that they undertake and complete an approved short course in animal handling and safety.

The Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences' policy outlining requirements in relation to student disability for entry to and progression within the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine are outlined below.

All students of the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine must possess the intellectual, ethical, physical and emotional capabilities required to participate in the full curriculum and to achieve the levels of competence at graduation required by the Faculty and the Veterinary Practitioners Registration Board of Victoria.

While the Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences will make reasonable adjustments to minimise the impact of a disability, all students must be able to participate in the program in an independent manner. It is not reasonable for students to use an intermediary as an adjustment to compensate for a disability impacting on any of the five categories listed below. In the clinical environment, there is a primary duty of care to the patients and the needs of students cannot compromise this. It is expected that all students will be able to participate fully in all classroom-based learning activities and to successfully fulfill the self-study requirements of the course. The presence of a disability will not automatically entitle the student to preferential treatment in clinical placement allocation.

A candidate for the DVM must have abilities and skills in the following five categories across all aspects of the course including practical classes and in clinical work:

  • Observation
  • Communication
  • Motor
  • Intellectual
  • Behavioural and social.

Observational Skills

Visual acuity is required in most aspects of the program. Students must be able to observe and participate in practical laboratory classes in the basic sciences, including physiology and pharmacology demonstrations and experiments, anatomy dissection classes, and practical classes in histology, general pathology, parasitology, microbiology and immunology. Visual acuity is necessary to identify and interpret gross lesions indicative of disease, view and interpret tissue sections and fluid smears via light microscopy, recognise pathogenic agents either with the naked eye or by microscopic examination, and read and interpret the results of many diagnostic tests.

Communication Skills

Students must be able to communicate effectively, both verbally and in written form. They must be capable of preparing written case reports, essays and other written assignments, of making oral presentations, and of satisfactorily completing examinations that require comprehension skills, clarity of expression, and the demonstration and application of relevant knowledge that is presented in a logical and coherent fashion.

Students must be able to maintain comprehensive and accurate written or electronic records, and to communicate effectively (both verbally and in writing) with the lay public, farmers, representatives of animal industries, diagnostic laboratories, pharmaceutical agencies, government and other responsible authorities, and members of the veterinary profession, using language that is appropriate to the audience and context.

Motor Skills

Students must possess sufficient motor function to be able to participate fully and independently in all classes. Practical class and clinical work activities require coordination of gross and fine muscular movements, equilibrium, and functional use of the senses of touch and vision. Students must be capable of identifying the potential risk of injury and take responsibility for their own safety, the safety of others and the safety of animals (including animal handling) whilst undertaking these activities.

Intellectual Skills

Problem-solving, a critical skill demanded of disease investigators, requires conceptual, integrative and quantitative intellectual skills. Students are expected to have the necessary intellectual capacity to permit them to develop and hone their skills in measurement, calculation, reasoning, analysis and synthesis over the course of the program, building on a strong foundational knowledge of the biological sciences. Students must also have the capacity to develop skills in critically evaluating scientific evidence and to comprehend and integrate complex information relating to multiple scientific disciplines.

Behavioural and Social Skills

Students must possess the behavioural and social attributes that enable them to participate in a complex learning environment. Students are required to take responsibility for their own participation and learning. As they also contribute to the learning of other students in a collaborative learning environment, they are expected to demonstrate inter-personal skills and an understanding of the needs of other students. Assessment components may include the outcomes of tasks completed in collaboration with other students.

Students must be capable of working effectively both as individuals and as members of teams. They are expected to behave in a respectful and collegial fashion not only with other students but also with academic, administrative and technical staff of the Faculty, members of the veterinary profession, representatives of animal and allied industries, and government authorities.

Students must be mature, self-aware and have the emotional health necessary to utilise their intellectual abilities fully. They must be aware of their personal limitations, and be cognisant of when and where to seek assistance or professional advice and support.

Attendance Requirements

Attendance at practical classes, tutorials, case studies, workshops and clinical rotations is compulsory in the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine course. Teaching staff may take a roll to record attendance. Students failing to comply with this requirement may be excluded from examinations. Alternatively, their results may be withheld and additional examinations or assignments given to demonstrate that the required level of competence in each subject has been attained.

The following additional information is provided for applicants and students.

Do I have to make a declaration or disclosure to the University about my disability?

No. The University doesn’t require students to disclose any form of disability at any stage, whether as part of the application process or as an enrolled student.

What should I do if I am worried about my ability to successfully fulfil a listed core participation requirement?

You may wish to contact with Student Equity and Disability Support (SEDS) at the University to discuss your specific issue: http://services.unimelb.edu.au/disability/contact_us. SEDS may be able to provide advice as to reasonable adjustments which may be made.

What is a reasonable adjustment?

The University of Melbourne is required by the Disability Discrimination Act 1992 (Cth), the Disability Standards for Education 2005 (Cth) and Equal Opportunity Act 2010 (Vic) to ensure that reasonable adjustments are made for students with disabilities.

“Reasonable adjustments” are modifications or accommodations made by the University that assist a student with a disability to participate in their course or access University facilities on the same basis as someone without a disability. A reasonable adjustment might be an aid to vision or hearing, allowing extra time for written examinations or an adjustment to hours of fieldwork. The role of Student Equity and Disability Support (SEDS) is to support students with disabilities, including assisting in the negotiation of reasonable adjustments for students who have disabilities.

Any such adjustments must be reasonable and cannot compromise the academic integrity of a course. Reasonable adjustments are provided to assist students to fulfil the core participation requirements, not as a substitute for those requirements.

Can I enrol even if I am not sure I will be able to fulfil some of the core participation requirements?

Yes. It is your decision as to whether or not you wish to enrol, if you are offered a place in the DVM course. It is unlawful for the University to make determinations regarding enrolment solely on the basis of disability, or to discriminate against students with a disability in other ways.

What happens if I do enrol and I am unable to fulfil some of the core participation requirements?

The Faculty is accountable to external accreditation bodies (i.e. Veterinary Practitioners Registration Board of Victoria) that its veterinary graduates meet registration requirements.

If you are unable to fulfil the core participation requirements even with reasonable adjustments having been made, you may fail a core component of the DVM. Should this occur, you would be not be able to complete the course, graduate from the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) or be registered as a veterinarian.

Professional accreditation

The veterinary program at the University of Melbourne is accredited by the Australasian Veterinary Boards Council, the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (London, United Kingdom), and the American Veterinary Medical Association. Accreditation is reviewed on a 7 year cycle for all accredited veterinary schools. The accrediting authorities have been informed of the changes to the degree structure through the customary annual reporting process. A formal review of the program will occur in line with the normal accreditation process.

Intended learning outcomes

The primary aim of the Melbourne DVM curriculum is to graduate highly capable veterinary scientists whose abilities to solve problems, to draw on the substantial body of veterinary knowledge, to interpret evidence, and to make decisions and act upon them within a clear ethical and professional framework embody all of the graduate attributes to which the Faculty aspires.

The DVM curriculum has been developed around five learning domains that describe the student’s progressive acquisition of the graduate attributes of a veterinary scientist. These domains or strands, that traverse all subjects of the DVM program, are:

  • The scientific basis of clinical practice
  • Ethics and animal welfare
  • Biosecurity and population health
  • Clinical skills, and
  • Personal and professional development

Graduates completing the DVM course will:

  • Possess and demonstrate a thorough understanding of contemporary knowledge in all disciplines of veterinary science 
  • Be able to demonstrate their competency in performing the clinical skills expected of a veterinary practitioner 
  • Be able to apply their knowledge and cognitive and technical skills to investigate complex problems, integrate information from a variety of sources, find effective solutions, and communicate and justify those solutions 
  • Possess the cognitive skills and knowledge to critically evaluate the scientific literature and future advances in veterinary science 
  • Have a solid understanding of the principles and methods used to undertake research in veterinary science 
  • Be able to demonstrate the ability to work effectively within the veterinary profession, both independently and as a member of a team
  • Possess and demonstrate superior verbal and written communication skills and the capacity to communicate effectively with other scientists, clients and the general public
  • Demonstrate a habit of self-awareness and be aware of and practise strategies that promote resilience and well-being in veterinary professional life
  • Be cognisant of biosecurity and public health issues in veterinary practice, utilise appropriate biosecurity measures, and know how to respond rapidly and effectively to a zoonotic, notifiable or exotic disease event in domestic or other animals
  • Understand and demonstrate the standards, ethical approach and professional behaviour expected of a veterinarian 
  • Prioritise animal welfare and ethical conduct in all of their veterinary professional activities
  • Possess a commitment to life-long learning and to service to the veterinary profession and the general community

 

Generic skills

The primary aim of the Melbourne DVM curriculum is to graduate highly capable veterinary scientists whose abilities to solve problems, to draw on the substantial body of veterinary knowledge, to interpret evidence, and to make decisions and act upon them within a clear ethical and professional framework embody all of the graduate attributes to which the Faculty aspires.

The DVM curriculum has been developed around five learning domains that describe the student’s progressive acquisition of the graduate attributes of a veterinary scientist. These domains or strands, that traverse all subjects of the DVM program, are:

  • The scientific basis of clinical practice
  • Ethics and animal welfare
  • Biosecurity and population health
  • Clinical skills, and
  • Personal and professional development

The DVM program encourages students to achieve the attributes of all graduates of the University of Melbourne in terms of academic excellence, knowledge acquisition, community leadership and responsibility, cultural sensitivity, and international awareness.

Knowledge

Graduates of the Melbourne DVM will have:

  • An extensive body of contemporary knowledge encompassing all disciplines and aspects of veterinary science
  • A knowledge of research principles and methods applicable to veterinary science and its professional practice

Skills

Graduates of the Melbourne DVM will have:

  • An advanced understanding of concepts, mechanisms and practical skills that underline veterinary science and its professional practice
  • The ability to investigate and seek solutions to complex problems and synthesise information encountered as a veterinary scientist, employing practical skills and the application of knowledge
  • The ability to apply their knowledge and technical skills to evaluate ideas and concepts presented to a veterinary scientist
  • The ability to interpret scientific findings and justify professional decisions through effective communication to clients, colleagues and support staff with empathy and concern for both animals and people
  • The ability to apply their knowledge, practical and communication skills to formulate and implement management strategies for addressing problems encountered as a contemporary veterinary scientist

Application of Knowledge and Skills

Graduates of the Melbourne DVM will demonstrate the application of knowledge and skills:

  • With the ability to adapt to changes in their field of employment and to advancements in veterinary science
  • With the ability to develop intellectual and physical skills in order to initiate and integrate new ideas into veterinary practice
  • With confidence in their veterinary capabilities on day one post-graduation, whilst at the same time recognising the extent of these capabilities and assuming individual professional responsibilities for them
  • By being a graduate of choice for employers
  • By being motivated to be a veterinarian, by being aware of the veterinarian’s place in global society and by being prepared to contribute to and be a leader in the community
  • By completing a professionally focussed research project and participate in a capstone experience

As a Masters level course, the DVM assumes and builds on the prior knowledge and experience in scientific thinking of students entering the course. From the first year of study an integrated and interdisciplinary approach is adopted. Students are expected to appraise data critically, to integrate concepts acquired in different disciplines, and to apply their understanding to authentic cases. They will be provided with opportunities to practise evidence-based decision-making, to solve clinical problems and to acquire clinical competencies in an ordered and sequential way.

The veterinary program at the University of Melbourne is accredited by the Australasian Veterinary Boards Council, the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (London, United Kingdom), and the American Veterinary Medical Association. Accreditation is reviewed on a 7 year cycle for all accredited veterinary schools.

Graduate attributes

The DVM program encourages students to achieve the attributes of all graduates of the University of Melbourne in terms of academic excellence, knowledge acquisition, community leadership and responsibility, cultural sensitivity, and international awareness.

In particular, the Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences intends that graduates of its DVM program should:

  • Be able to seek solutions to problems through the application of knowledge, the ability to initiate and integrate new ideas, an appreciation of the broad picture of science, and an understanding of the importance and application of scientific method
  • Deal with integrity and honesty with professional colleagues, clients and the general public
  • Demonstrate empathy and concern for animals and people
  • Possess an understanding of both scientific and vocational aspects of veterinary science
  • Be motivated to be a veterinarian, aware of the veterinarian’s place in society, and prepared to be a leader in the community
  • Have broad knowledge of veterinary science and be able to develop intellectual and physical skills as circumstances dictate
  • Be trained in all disciplines and aspects of veterinary science
  • Be adaptable to changes in their specific field of employment and to advancements in veterinary science in general
  • Be confident in their veterinary capabilities on day one post-graduation whilst recognising the limitations of their training
  • Be aware of the global society and equipped to contribute to it
  • Be a graduate of choice for employers.

As a Masters level course, the DVM assumes and builds on the prior knowledge and experience in scientific thinking of students entering the course. From the first year of study, an integrated and interdisciplinary approach is adopted. Students are expected to appraise data critically, to integrate concepts acquired in different disciplines, and to apply their understanding to authentic cases. They will be provided with opportunities to practise evidence-based decision-making, to solve clinical problems and to acquire clinical competencies in an ordered and sequential way.

Course structure

All subjects in the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine course are core.

See the Subject Options section below for the structure of this course.

From 2019 onwards, all subjects in Year One, Two and Three of the DVM course are semesterised. Year 4 remains a year-long subject.

The Year level descriptions of the DVM course below include references to the subjects offered prior to 2019 that have since been replaced. Refer to previous years’ Handbook entries for detailed descriptions of these superseded subjects.

Subject options

All subjects in the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine course are core.

YEAR ONE (DVM 1)

All of:

Code Name Study period Credit Points
VETS90058 Veterinary Bioscience 1A
Semester 1
37.5
VETS90059 Veterinary Bioscience 1B
Semester 2
25
VETS90060 Applications in Animal Health A
Semester 1
12.5
VETS90061 Applications in Animal Health B
Semester 2
25

YEAR ONE (DVM 1) WITH ADVANCED STANDING FROM 2019

Students enrolled in the DVM who have been granted advanced standing based on completed studies at the University of Melbourne and who have previously completed all three of the following subjects:

  • VETS20014 Foundations of Animal Health 1
  • VETS20015 Foundations of Animal Health 2
  • VETS30015 Veterinary Bioscience: Cells to Systems

These students should enrol in all of the following:

Code Name Study period Credit Points
VETS90062 Principles of Veterinary Bioscience
Semester 1
25
VETS90059 Veterinary Bioscience 1B
Semester 2
25
VETS90082 Animal Management and Veterinary Health
Semester 2
12.5

YEAR ONE (VIA THE VETERINARY BIOSCIENCE SPECIALISATION IN THE ANIMAL HEALTH AND DISEASE MAJOR in the B-SCI) FROM 2019

Students enrolled in the Bachelor of Science - Animal Health and Disease Major (Veterinary Bioscience specialisation) should enrol in all of the following:

Code Name Study period Credit Points
VETS30015 Veterinary Bioscience: Cells to Systems
Semester 1
12.5
VETS30016 Veterinary Bioscience: Digestive System
Semester 1
12.5
VETS30017 Veterinary Bioscience: Metab & Excretion
Semester 1
12.5
VETS30014 Veterinary Bioscience: Cardiovasc System
Semester 2
12.5
VETS30018 Veterinary Bioscience:Respiratory System
Semester 2
12.5
VETS30013 Animal Health in Production Systems
Semester 2
12.5


YEAR one (DVM 1), PRIOR TO 2019

VETS90063 Principles of Veterinary Biosci. 1 Pt B (Semester 2, 25 credit points) - Not offered after 2018

YEAR TWO (DVM 2)

All of:

Code Name Study period Credit Points
VETS90064 Veterinary Bioscience 2A
Semester 1
18.75
VETS90101 Veterinary Bioscience 2B
Semester 2
18.75
VETS90099 Infections and Immunity A
Semester 1
18.75
VETS90100 Infections and Immunity B
Semester 2
18.75
VETS90097 Production, Herd and Public Health A
Semester 1
12.5
VETS90098 Production, Herd and Public Health B
Semester 2
12.5

YEAR TWO (DVM 2), PRIOR TO 2019

VETS90065 Veterinary Bioscience 2 Part B (Semester 1, 25 credit points) - Not offered after 2018
VETS90066 Infections Population & Pub. Health PtA (Semester 1, 25 credit points) - Not offered after 2018
VETS90067 Infections Population & Pub. Health PtB (Semester 2, 18.75 credit points) - Not offered after 2018
VETS90068 Applications in Animal Health 2 Part A (Semester 1, 6.25 credit points) - Not offered after 2019
VETS90069 Applications in Animal Health 2 Part B (Semester 2, 6.25 credit points) - Not offered after 2019

YEAR THREE (DVM 3) FROM 2019:

All of:

Code Name Study period Credit Points
VETS90076 Veterinary Medicine and Surgery A
February
37.5
VETS90077 Veterinary Medicine and Surgery B
Semester 2
37.5
VETS90078 Veterinary Research Project A
February
6.25
VETS90079 Veterinary Research Project B
Semester 2
6.25
VETS90080 Professional Portfolio A
February
6.25
VETS90081 Professional Portfolio B
Semester 2
6.25

The third year of the DVM course incorporates tracks. Tracks provide opportunities for students to undertake practical classes and activities in a chosen area of veterinary science to complement their core training. The four tracks available to students are Production Animal, Small Animal, Equine, and Government, Industry and Conservation Health. Track practical classes and activities are components of VETS90080 Professional Portfolio A and VETS90081 Professional Portfolio B within DVM 3.

For further information about tracks, see: https://study.unimelb.edu.au/find/courses/graduate/doctor-of-veterinary-medicine/where-will-this-take-me/

YEAR THREE (DVM 3), PRIOR TO 2019

  • VETS90070 Principles of Professional Practice PtA (Semester 1, 12.5 credit points) - Not offered after 2017
  • VETS90071 Principles of Professional Practice PtB (Semester 2, 12.5 credit points) - Not offered after 2018
  • VETS90072 Companion Animal Medicine & Surgery Pt A (Semester 1, 18.75 credit points) - Not offered after 2017
  • VETS90073 Companion Animal Medicine & Surgery Pt B (Semester 2, 18.75 credit points) - Not offered after 2018
  • VETS90074 Production Animal Medicine & Surgery Pt A (Semester 1, 18.75 credit points) - Not offered after 2017
  • VETS90075 Production Animal Medicine & Surgery Pt B (Semester 2, 18.75 credit points) - Not offered after 2018

YEAR FOUR (DVM 4)

Code Name Study period Credit Points
VETS90096 Veterinary Professional Practice
Year Long
100

Progression in the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine

STANDING RULES

A student cannot enrol in any subject in the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) course without having completed satisfactorily the prerequisite subject(s).

Convening of the Course Academic Progress Committee (CAPC)

The Faculty's Course Academic Progress Committee will convene after results have been certified for each subject to review the progress of any student in the Repeat the Subject, Repeat the Year or Termination of Enrolment category. Students in these categories will be invited to make an oral and/or written submission to the Committee. The CAPC is authorised to make decisions on behalf of the Faculty with respect to the progress of individual students and to vary the Standing Rules if it deems that progression of a student can be facilitated without adversely affecting academic standards.


STANDING RULES - Years 1, 2 and 3

1. Hurdle Requirements

1.1 Students must pass each subject on the aggregate mark. If a subject is pass/fail only, students must pass that subject outright.
1.2 Students must pass each unit of a subject on the aggregate mark.
1.3 A minimum mark of 40% in the end-of-semester examination component of any subject or unit is required for a student to be eligible to pass that subject or unit. Students obtaining an aggregate mark of 50% or more in a subject or unit but a mark below 40% in the end-of-semester examination of that subject or unit will be required to pass a hurdle reassessment in order to pass that subject or unit.

2. Hurdle Reassessment

2.1 A hurdle reassessment is a further assessment that will be offered for a failed hurdle component of a subject provided that the student has:

  • Achieved a mark of 40% or greater in the subject, and
  • Failed no more than two hurdle requirements across all subjects in that semester.

2.2 Hurdle reassessments will be offered to eligible students following the release of final subject results.
2.3 A hurdle reassessment is a complete examination in the hurdle component and is the sole determinant of the mark for that hurdle component.
2.4 The format of the hurdle reassessment may differ from that of the original assessment. The maximum mark recorded for a hurdle reassessment is 50%.
2.5 Some hurdle requirements may not contribute to the final mark in a subject. Where the numeric result for a hurdle requirement contributes to the overall subject mark, the hurdle reassessment mark will be used in that calculation.
2.6 A hurdle reassessment will not be offered to a student who falls into the Repeat the Subject or Termination of Enrolment category.
2.7 A hurdle reassessment will not be offered to a student who fails a hurdle whilst repeating a subject.

3. Supplementary Examinations

3.1 A supplementary examination will be offered for a subject in which a student achieves a mark between 40% and 49% (inclusive) and has satisfactorily completed all prescribed hurdle requirements.
3.2 A supplementary examination is a complete examination in a subject and is the sole determinant of the final mark for that subject. No earlier assessment components of the subject will contribute to the final mark in that subject. The format of the supplementary examination may differ from that of the original examination(s) in that subject. A supplementary examination may be comprised of more than one assessment type. The maximum mark recorded for a supplementary examination is 50%.
3.3 A supplementary examination will not be offered for a subject in which a student has failed a hurdle reassessment.
3.4 A supplementary examination will not be offered to a student who falls into the Repeat the Subject or Termination of Enrolment category.
3.5 A supplementary examination will not be offered to a student who fails a subject on a repeat attempt.

4. Repeat the Subject

4.1 Students in DVM 1, DVM 2 and DVM 3 are permitted to repeat subjects if they do not fall into the Termination of Enrolment category.
4.2 Repeating students are required to undertake only those subjects that they have failed and must complete all components of those subjects.
4.3 Students repeating one or more subjects must pass all components of those subjects outright and are not eligible for supplementary examinations or hurdle reassessments.

5. Termination of Enrolment

5.1 A DVM 1, DVM 2 or DVM 3 student will be placed in the Termination of Enrolment category if he or she:

  • Fails all subjects in a semester
  • Fails any subject at the first attempt with a mark of less than 40%
  • Fails any repeated subject

STANDING RULES – Year 4

1. Hurdle Requirements

1.1 A student cannot graduate without satisfactorily completing all components of the Veterinary Professional Practice subject.
1.2 Students must pass the Veterinary Professional Practice subject on the aggregate mark.
1.3 Students must pass each of the nine hurdles in the Veterinary Professional Practice subject.

2. Hurdle Reassessment

2.1 A hurdle reassessment is a further assessment that will be offered to eligible students who have failed the research project or up to two internal or external clinical rotations or extramural placements.
2.2 A hurdle reassessment is a complete reassessment of the hurdle component and is the sole determinant of the mark for that hurdle component.
2.3 Where the numeric result for a hurdle requirement contributes to the overall subject mark, the hurdle reassessment mark will be used in that calculation.
2.4 Research Project
2.4.1 Eligible students who fail the research project will be permitted to re-submit the project during the supplementary assessment period. The maximum mark recorded for this hurdle reassessment is 50%.
2.5 Clinical Rotations or Extramural Placements
2.5.1 Eligible students will be permitted to repeat up to two failed internal or external clinical rotations or extramural placements. The failed rotations/placements can be repeated during the year or after the examination period, at the discretion of the DVM 4 coordinators. The duration of the repeated rotation/placement will be decided by the DVM 4 coordinators. The maximum mark recorded for a repeat rotation/placement is 50%
2.6 A hurdle reassessment will not be offered to a student who falls into the Repeat the Year or Termination of Enrolment category.
2.7 A hurdle reassessment will not be offered to a student who fails a hurdle whilst repeating Veterinary Professional Practice.

3. Supplementary Assessment

3.1 Students will be offered supplementary assessment if they do not fall into the Repeat the Year or Termination of Enrolment category. To be eligible for supplementary assessment, students must have passed at least four of the five themes of Veterinary Professional Practice and have an overall subject mark of at least 40%.
3.2 Supplementary assessment will be offered to eligible students who fail the end-of-year written examination.
3.3 Supplementary assessment will be offered to eligible students who fail three internal or external clinical rotations or extramural placements.
3.4 Supplementary assessment will be offered to eligible students who fail one repeated internal or external clinical rotation or extramural placement.
3.5 Supplementary assessment will be offered to eligible students who fail one of the five themes in Veterinary Professional Practice with a mark in that theme of at least 40%.
3.6 Supplementary assessment will not be offered if a student has failed a hurdle reassessment for the research project.
3.7 Supplementary assessment will not be offered to a student who falls into the Repeat the Year or Termination of Enrolment category.
3.8 Supplementary assessment will not be offered to a student who fails any hurdle whilst repeating the year.
3.9 A supplementary assessment is the sole determinant of the final mark for the subject. No earlier assessment components of the subject will contribute to the final mark. The maximum mark that can be recorded for the subject after supplementary assessment is 50%.
3.10 The format of the supplementary assessment may differ from that of the original assessment(s) and may involve more than one component and type of assessment.

4. Repeat the Year

4.1 A DVM 4 student who does not fall into the Termination of Enrolment category will be permitted to repeat the year if he or she:

  • fails four or more internal or external clinical rotations or extramural placements, or
  • fails more than one repeated internal or external clinical rotation or extramural placement, or
  • fails the research project after hurdle reassessment, or
  • fails a supplementary examination, or
  • fails Veterinary Professional Practice after hurdle reassessment or supplementary assessment with a mark between 40 and 49%.

4.2 Repeating DVM 4 students are required to undertake and successfully complete all components of Veterinary Professional Practice on the first repeated attempt. Repeating students are not eligible for hurdle reassessment or supplementary assessment.

5. Termination of Enrolment

5.1 A DVM 4 student will be placed in the Termination of Enrolment category if he or she:

  • fails Veterinary Professional Practice at the first attempt with a mark of less than 40%, or
  • fails any of the five themes of Veterinary Professional Practice with a mark of less than 40%, or
  • fails two or more of the five themes of Veterinary Professional Practice, or
  • fails any hurdle in a repeated year.
Last updated: 2 May 2019